Editorial: Bill Doelle Argues for Preserving Bears Ears

Tuesday, August 9th, 2016

Editorial: Archaeology Southwest President Bill Doelle Argues for Preserving Bears Ears Public lands don’t offer enough protections, and this remarkable land in Utah is under attack. http://bit.ly/2aXNoFO – Arizona Republic AZ Governor Appoints Kathryn Leonard as the New SHPO On August 8, 2016, Governor Doug Ducey appointed Kathryn Leonard to the position of State Historic Preservation […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Gorod Durakov, or What’s In a Name?

Gorod Durakov
Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist (April 5, 2016)—I spent a wonderful and exhausting six days in late March as a guide for a weeklong members’ tour of Salado and Classic Hohokam archaeological sites in the valleys of southern Arizona. Bill Doelle, Lyle Balenquah, and Alan Osbourne were my co-guides. Up shortly after dawn (yes, even me, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

You’re Invited: Making Archaeology Public

Aerial Photograph of the Early Agricultural Period Site of Las Capas. Image Copyright Henry Wallace 2011
Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Sarah Herr, Senior Project Director, Desert Archaeology, Inc. (January 12, 2016)—This Thursday night in Tucson, the 15th biennial Southwest Symposium opens. The Southwest Symposium has always been one of my favorite archaeological conferences, as archaeologists working in the Southwest United States and Northwest Mexico gather to discuss new research, new theories, and new ways of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Let the Mystery Vanish

Sandal
Friday, November 6th, 2015

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator mystery — noun mys·tery \ˈmis-t(ə-)rē\ 2 a: something not understood or beyond understanding: enigma vanish — verb van·ish \ˈva-nish\ 1 a: to pass quickly from sight: disappear; b: to pass completely from existence “The greatest vanishing act in prehistoric America,” Nature, 11/3/15. Excellent article, erroneous headline. Toward the end of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Invest in Ourselves, in Our Sense of Place

Honeybee Reconstruction by Rob Ciaccio
Wednesday, October 28th, 2015

Bill Doelle, President & CEO (October 28, 2015)—Archaeology Southwest is an enthusiastic supporter of the seven Pima County bond proposals that are on the November 3 ballot. Our mission—to explore and protect the places of our past—is at the core of many of the bond projects. In previous bond elections, Pima County voters overwhelmingly approved […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Fateful Bananas

Jeff in Ekron, 1985
Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

Between now and October 17, 2015, Archaeology Southwest is participating in the Archaeological Institute of America’s celebration of International Archaeology Day (10/17/15) by sharing blog posts about why—or how—we became archaeologists. Today we feature Jeffery Clark, Preservation Archaeologist at Archaeology Southwest and Adjunct Associate Professor, University of Arizona. Previous posts in the series are here. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Ancient Engineering: “Hanging” Canals

Marijilda Mesa Canal
Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Archaeology Southwest is honored to feature “The Prehistoric Bajada ‘Hanging’ Canals of the Safford Basin: Small Corporate Group Engineering in Southeastern Arizona,” written by James A. Neely, Professor Emeritus, University of Texas, and co-researcher Don Lancaster of Thatcher, Arizona, especially for our Preservation Archaeology blog. This update follows on Dr. Neely’s post from April 2014. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Hohokam Village Excavated to Make Way for Future Strip Mall

Sunday, August 24th, 2014

Hohokam Village Excavated to Make Way for Future Strip Mall A “really nice picture” of the workings of early Hohokam civilization is emerging from a recent excavation that uncovered at least part of a prehistoric-era village at a planned Marana outlet mall site. “This site is revealing, because of the scale of their excavations at one […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Southwestern Archaeology Loses a Beloved Patron

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

Remembering Molly Thompson Molly Coit Kendall Thompson died at home in Tucson on Monday, February 10, 2014, at the age of 90. Her husband of 65 years and her older daughter were with her. Molly was born in Tombstone in 1923, where she grew up on the Kendall family ranch with her two sisters. Her […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Not Exactly a Vacant Lot!

Matt Peeples Leads a Tour of Valencia
Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

By Stephen Darling, Archaeology Southwest Member since 2013 This past Saturday morning, March 8, my wife Anne-Marie, my friend Steve Cox, and I attended Archaeology Southwest’s 2014 Annual Members’ Gathering, which featured a walking tour of the Valencia site. Owned by Pima Community College and Pima County, the Valencia site is protected from any future […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Heighten Your Awareness on March 29

Romero Ruin
Thursday, March 6th, 2014

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist   March is Archaeology and Heritage Awareness Month for the State of Arizona. Setting aside a month to celebrate archaeology highlights the importance of our shared past, as well as the social and economic impacts of archaeology in the state. Of course, there are tours, events, and lectures on archaeology […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Exploring the Edge, March 1–2

Scorpion in a Shovel
Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

By Lewis Borck, Preservation Archaeology Fellow Preparations for Edge of Salado research (click on that link to learn more) have been underway for the past month:   Excavations began two weekends ago in the Sulphur Springs Valley:   And we often had company! We continued this past weekend in the Coyote Mountains at a platform […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Reinventing the West – Recreation vs. Extraction

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Reinventing the West A strange thing happened in Escalante, Utah, during the government shutdown last fall. The town, a remote community of fewer than 800 souls perched on a high desert plain around a trickle of water called the Escalante River, is surrounded on all sides by the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, two million federally […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Back to Basics, Part 2: Archaeological Cultures in the Southwest

El Paso Polychrome
Wednesday, November 27th, 2013

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist   On Monday, I wrote about how archaeologists define culture areas, which represent geographic zones in which people were living in generally similar ways and across which people were connected through shared history and practices. Before we look at the three main culture areas of the Southwest, I should say […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

This Post Is Not about the Borg or Peanut-Butter Cups—Or Is It?

Peanut Butter Cup
Monday, November 4th, 2013

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator, with Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist   (November 4, 2013)—One of the most rewarding aspects of serving as the content editor of Archaeology Southwest Magazine is the continual opportunity to learn new things directly from the finest scholars. I have been fortunate to have Tobi Taylor, the previous content editor, and […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

In the Mountain Shadows

ASWM Volume 27, Number 1
Tuesday, May 14th, 2013

Issue editors William Doelle and Deborah Swartz present the continuing story of the Romero Ruin, a Hohokam village and historic homestead located in southern Arizona’s Catalina State Park.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

Celebrating Catalina State Park (and Getting Some Sherds Washed)

Washing Sherds
Friday, May 10th, 2013

By Linda Pierce, Deputy Director   Last Saturday, a number of us at Archaeology Southwest were happy to take part in the 30th anniversary celebration for Catalina State Park. Encompassing 5,500 acres on the north side of Tucson, the park is a haven for Sonoran Desert plants and wildlife, and also protects a number of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Excavations at Sky Harbor Reveal More Information on Hohokam Canal Systems

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

Excavations at Sky Harbor Reveal More Information on Hohokam Canal Systems Under the dull roar of an airplane descending toward Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport’s north runway, Kenny Bowekaty cordons off a roughly 4-foot-square section of earth. Slowly, Bowekaty works through the dirt, sometimes with a shovel or trowel, sometimes with his bare hands. Behind him, […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Migrants and Mounds

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Archaeology Southwest Publishes Much-Anticipated “Migrants and Mounds” Preservation Archaeology in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River valley reveals a story of migration, tension, and integration in the distant past Tucson, Ariz. (November 14, 2012) — Archaeology Southwest is pleased to announce the publication of Migrants and Mounds: Classic Period Archaeology of the Lower San Pedro Valley, […]



Filed Under: Press Release

President Declares Chimney Rock a National Monument

Sunday, September 23rd, 2012

Chimney Rock Declared a National Monument President Obama exercised his authority under the Antiquities Act to designate a new national monument at Chimney Rock Archaeological Area in southwestern Colorado. The president’s decision provides this irreplaceable site with permanent protection and a designation equal to its historical and cultural importance. Located in San Juan National Forest, the 4,726-acre Chimney Rock Archaeological […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Black Mat (not) From Outer Space

Sunday, April 29th, 2012

The Black Mat (not) From Outer Space A giant cosmic collision with Earth and an asteroid or comet is now the leading culprit behind the mass extinction that ended the Age of Dinosaurs about 65 million years ago. However, there is much controversy regarding whether a cosmic explosion, or something else, caused a more recent […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Imaging the Past

Archaeology Southwest V.25 No.3 Cover
Tuesday, January 10th, 2012

Authors in this issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine seek to understand and convey relationships among past, place, and human life through images from above, beneath, and beyond.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

US Transportation Bill Could Threaten Funds used for Archaeological Research

Sunday, November 13th, 2011

US Transportation Bill Could Threaten Funds used for Archaeological Research They’ve recovered more than 45,000 “world-class artifacts … nowhere else on the continent do we have this kind of stuff from this period,” says David Clarke, the state archaeologist for the Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT), which received money for the dig from a special […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Homeland Security Act Raises Troubling Issues for Archaeological Protection and Historic Preservation

Sunday, October 9th, 2011

Homeland Security Act Raises Troubling Issues for Archaeological Protection and Historic Preservation The proposed National Security and Federal Lands Protection Act would let the agency waive 36 federal environmental protection laws in the name of better border patrols on public lands. Supporters say it would help U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents secure the nation’s borders. […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

New Video Traverses the Great Bend of the Gila

Area near the Great Bend of the Gila River, copyright Henry Wallace 2011
Wednesday, September 21st, 2011

This Archaeology Southwest video takes you on a spectacular journey to the Gila Bend region of southern Arizona, where you will experience the richness and fragility of this abiding cultural crossroads.



Filed Under: Featured