Reed Testifies on Chaco at House Committee Field Hearing

"It is long past time to set aside and protect the irreplaceable Greater Chaco Landscape of New Mexico." Image courtesy of EcoFlight.

Bears Ears: What's at Stake

Photographer Jonathan Bailey shares a few of the places that are now made vulnerable by the president’s illegal near-revocation.

Acoma Perspectives on Greater Chaco

Archaeology Southwest has received a grant from the National Trust for Historic Preservation to support the Pueblo of Acoma Preservation Study of the Greater Chaco Landscape.

Calling All Volunteers

Would you like to help us prepare a collection for curation? Apply today to volunteer for the Raymond F. Robinson Project, starting this September.

Welcome

For three decades, Archaeology Southwest has practiced a holistic, conservation-based approach to exploring the places of the past. We call this Preservation Archaeology. By exploring what makes a place special, sharing this knowledge in innovative ways, and enacting flexible site protection strategies, we foster meaningful connections to the past and respectfully safeguard its irreplaceable resources.

Current Magazine

Tucson Underground

This issue explores communities in the Tucson Basin across some 4,000 years. The region is part of the traditional territory of the O’odham people, who have been here since time immemorial. The Spanish place name Tucson is in fact derived from the O’odham S-cuk Son, “at the base of the black hill,” also known today as Sentinel Peak—Tucson’s birthplace. Ancestors of today’s O’odham people ranged, settled, and farmed this land, from the deep past into the historic era.

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From Our Blog

Commentary: Rosemont Mine Will Be Disastrous for Tohono O’odham Sacred Lands

Commentary: Rosemont Mine Will Be Disastrous for Tohono O'odham Sacred Lands The mountainous area southeast of Tucson is sacred to the Tohono O’odham Nation. For thousands of years, our people have...

A Perspective on the Lower Gila River Ethnographic and Archaeological Project

Skylar Begay (April 22, 2019)—Before I begin, I feel it’s important to provide context for the reader as to who I am. My name is Skylar Begay and I’m 25 years old. I was born on the Navajo ...