News from Archaeology Southwest

Contact

Kate Sarther
Communications Director
Email | (520) 882-6946, ext. 16

 

2022
17
May

Glen Canyon Sites Re-emerge

Dear Friends, I am in Albuquerque this week, attending the Conservation Lands Foundation’s 2022 Summit. Skylar Begay, Ashleigh Thompson, and I drove up from Tucson on Monday, had a couple of meetings in Albuquerque on Tuesday, and enjoyed the conference opening last night. This is a signific...
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2022
12
May

Lower Gila Topophilia

Aaron M. Wright, Preservation Archaeologist (May 12, 2022)—This month marks five years since I had the honor to announce the addition of the Fleming Parcel to Archaeology Southwest’s portfolio of conservation properties. This important place is located along the lower Gila River about an ho...
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2022
10
May

80,000 Strong for Greater Chaco

Dear Friends, Thank you for stepping up these past months to show your support for the Greater Chaco landscape. Our top story today reports that some 80,000 responses were submitted to the Bureau of Land Management. That’s progress—and an important step in a long process. We’ll need you ...
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2022
06
May

More Than 80,000 Comments Submitted in Support of Chaco Protections

Taos, N.M. (May 6, 2022)—Today was the final day to comment on the Bureau of Land Management's proposed mineral withdrawal for federal lands within 10 miles of Chaco Culture National Historical Park. Read New Mexico Wild's press release on the outpouring of support here. Preservation Archaeolog...
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2022
04
May

Chaco and Naco

Dear Friends, Today let’s start with two short words that rhyme and two consecutive numbers. Chaco and Naco. 10 and 11. Chaco—actually the Greater Chaco Cultural Landscape—is threatened by oil and gas extraction. I sincerely hope that you will take two actions as soon as possible. First,...
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2022
03
May

Camp Naco Is Back in the News

Bill Doelle, President & CEO (May 4, 2022)—I have spent nearly five decades in southern Arizona. That’s long enough to gain a realistic perspective on the pace of preservation advocacy. Sadly, failure is often rapid. But success often takes decades. Camp Naco has been part of Archaeo...
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2022
02
May

Now Showing: Protecting Chaco's 10-Mile Zone

New Film Showcases Broad Support from Tribal Leaders for Protecting Federal Lands Surrounding Chaco Canyon Taos, N.M. (May 2, 2022)—We are pleased to announce the public premiere of “Protecting Chaco’s 10-Mile Zone,” a mini-documentary produced by Paul Reed and Archaeology Southwest, and fi...
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2022
26
Apr

Tunnel Fire Swept through Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument

Dear Friends, I’m in the field this morning, doing some filming in the few hours before the temperatures in the Great Bend of the Gila reach triple digits, so I have to keep this short. In this week following Earth Day, when so much of the news is about war and climate change impacts, I am g...
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2022
21
Apr

Protect Chaco Comment Deadline Is May 6

Banner image of well pad in Greater Chaco courtesy of EcoFlight Paul F. Reed, Preservation Archaeologist and Chaco Scholar (April 21, 2022)—In November 2021, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland announced the withdrawal of 351,000 acres of Federal surface land from oil-gas development in a 10-mile z...
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2022
19
Apr

Blue Corn, Melons, and the Climate Crisis

Dear Friends, When a mentor of the highest order passes, it prompts deep reflection. Last Thursday, R. Gwinn Vivian (1935–2022) passed peacefully. I consider Gwinn my highest-order mentor. And I am merely one among many who feel similar gratitude and loss. If it weren’t for Gwinn, I wou...
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2022
19
Apr

In Memoriam: Gwinn Vivian

Paul F. Reed, Preservation Archaeologist and Chaco Scholar (April 19, 2022)—I cannot think of a Southwestern archaeologist and scholar who has made a more positive impact on our field than Gwinn Vivian (1935–2022). And the effect his recent passing is having on all of us who were fortunate to...
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2022
12
Apr

Administration Puts $1B behind Conservation Goals

Dear Friends, This time of year, the glorious yellow blossoms of the palo verde trees can lead you to forget that we are more than two decades into a major drought. In Tucson the bloom is just beginning, but last Friday, as I drove to Gila Bend, which is at a lower elevation, the bloom was intens...
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