Our Projects

We ask “big questions” about people’s lives in this region in the past. We protect places on the land. We advocate for the protection and interpretation of cultural landscapes.

The Heritage Southwest Database

The Heritage Southwest (HSW) database is a digital geodatabase containing information on more than 10,000 precontact (prehistoric) and historic archaeological sites in the U.S. Southwest and northern Mexico. The large HSW database is divided into a number of smaller sub-databases, each developed for...
current
Active, Research

Migration and Change in the Southern Southwest

Banner image courtesy of Eastern Arizona College The centuries between A.D. 1200 and 1540 were a time of great change in the Southwest. Deteriorating environmental conditions on the Colorado Plateau in the late 1200s led people to leave the Four Corners region. This movement of northern peoples i...
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Advocacy, Outreach, Research

The Edge of Salado

What slows or halts the geographic spread of an ideology—especially an ideology that brings people together? Preservation Fellow Lewis Borck found out. His research built on previous work done by Archaeology Southwest that focused on detecting Kayenta immigrants and determining their impacts i...
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Research

Saving Camp Naco, Arizona

Built between 1919 and 1923, Camp Naco (also known as Camp Newell) first housed military personnel during the Mexican Border Defense campaign and later served as a base camp for the Civilian Conservation Corps. Troops encamped at the facility included units of the renowned Buffalo Soldiers. The only...
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Active, Advocacy, Site Protection

Coordinated Resource Management Planning for Arizo...

Archaeology Southwest joins the Bureau of Land Management, United States Forest Service, Arizona Game and Fish Department, and other stakeholders in identifying long-term needs and management goals for Arizona’s Perry Mesa. The Red Deer of Perry Mesa. Photograph by Andy Laurenzi. Click to e...
current
Advocacy, Site Protection

Travel Management on Our National Forests

Campfire ring and vehicle turnaround within site boundary. Click to enlarge. If you’ve ever visited one of our National Forests, part of your experience within its boundaries involved travel on a road open to motorized vehicles. Over the past 30 years, as the popularity and availability...
current
Active, Advocacy, Site Protection

Chaco Social Networks

Banner image by Ely Rareshide Doorways in Pueblo Bonito The Dynamics of Chacoan Social and Spatial Networks, A.D. 800–1200 With National Science Foundation support, we are collaborating with a team of researchers (including Archaeology Southwest’s Paul Reed and Matt Peeples) to lo...
current
Active, Research

Collections Management at Salmon Pueblo

20 years of collections in disarray One goal of the partnership between Archaeology Southwest and Salmon Ruins Museum involved long-term curation and preservation of the enormous Salmon artifact, sample, and archival-photographic collection. As was the case with many large projects in the...
completed
Research

Social Networks in the Late Precontact Southwest

Click here (opens as a PDF) to read the latest article on the project in the professional journal American Antiquity (Vol. 80, No. 1, 2015). In the age of Facebook and Twitter, “social network” is a phrase heard or read almost daily—but social networks are a mainstay of the human experience...
completed
Research

Snaketown Artistic Heritage Project

Banner image: View of the Hohokam Pima National Monument, by BruceandLetty, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons The Snaketown Artistic Heritage Project preserved information. Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology) worked with the Arizona State Museum to scientifically docume...
completed
Research

Honey Bee Village: Community-Based Interpretive Pl...

The goal of the Honey Bee Village project was to engage the public in developing a multicultural interpretive plan for the Honey Bee Village archaeological preserve. This Hohokam village site is now in the center of the rapidly-growing town of Oro Valley, Arizona. The land containing most of this ar...
completed
Outreach

Las Ventanas

The Las Ventanas (or Candelaria) great house lies about 112 km south of the Chacoan center at Pueblo Bonito, within the boundaries of the El Malpais National Monument. The great house comprises a two-story structure with perhaps 80 total rooms that was built during the Chacoan era from A.D. 1050–1...
completed
Research
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