What We Do: Information

The Site That Nobody Really Knows

Archaeology Southwest Magazine, Vol. 30, No. 1

Issue editor: John R. Welch, Simon Fraser University

ASWM Vol. 30, No. 1 Cover

Byron Cummings (1860–1954) in a rebuilt room at Kinishba in 1942. Image: Chuck Abbott. Courtesy of Dedi and Mike Hoeck

Kinishba, the site that nobody really knows—even though it is among the most extensively excavated, rebuilt, and visited sites in the American Southwest. In 2003, a box of previously unexamined documents came to light, reawakening research on the pueblo and its inhabitants.

For further reading (opens as a PDF)

The Site That Nobody Really Knows: Kinishba Reawakened — John R. Welch

Website of the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Information on visiting Kinishba from the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Website of the Hopi Tribe

Chuck Abbott and Esther Henderson (and here!)

Episodes in Kinishba History — John R. Welch

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 27, No. 4 — A

Kinishba

Kinishba. Photo by Chuck Abbott or Esther Henderson. Courtesy of Dedi and Mike Hoeck.

New Way of Living

A Dream Deferred: Cummings and the Shaeffers at Kinishba — John R. Welch

Kinishba (1940) by Byron Cummings (opens as a PDF)

Arizona State Museum

History of the University of Arizona School of Anthropology

Cummings’s tenure as acting president of the University of Arizona

Tad Nichols

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties

The Fateful Box: Excavations at Kinishba after 1939 — John R. Welch

Arizona State Museum Archaeological Collections

Deer Jaws

Painted deer jaws from Kinishba in the collections of the Arizona State Museum. Catalog numbers identified by curator Arthur W. Vokes. Click on the image to enlarge.

Before Kinishba: Two Mogollon Pithouse VillagesRichard Ciolek-Torello and Carl D. Halbirt

Museum of Northern Arizona

Archaeology Southwest Fact Sheet: Who or What Is Mogollon? (opens as a PDF)

What Grasshopper Pueblo Tells Us about Kinishba: An Architectural PerspectiveCharles R. Riggs

The Movement of People and PotsDaniela Triadan

Arizona State Museum Archaeological Collections

Kinishba’s Pottery RevisitedPatrick D. Lyons

Arizona State Museum Archaeological Collections

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 27, No. 3 — Before the Great Departure

Archaeology Southwest Fact Sheet Series: Who or What Is Salado? (opens as a PDF)

The Kinishba Boundary Survey — John R. Welch, Nicholas C. Laluk, and Mark T. Altaha

Website of the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Information on visiting Kinishba from the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Preservation Spotlight: Apache, Hopi, and Zuni Perspectives on Kinishba History and Stewardship — John R. Welch and T. J. Ferguson

Website of the Hopi Tribe

Website of the White Mountain Apache Tribe

Website of the Zuni Tribe

NAGPRA, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (1990)

Fort Apache Heritage Foundation

Back SightWilliam H. Doelle

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 26, No. 1 — What Is Preservation Archaeology?

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