What We Do: Information

Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 24, No. 4
Free PDF download of this issue

Issue editor: Deborah L. Huntley, Ph.D., Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology)

The 2010 Mule Creek Field Team

The 2010 Mule Creek Field Team, from left to right: Katherine Dungan (Assistant Project Director), Deborah Huntley (Project Director), Meaghan Trowbridge (University of Arizona), Jane Carmack (Hendrix College), Lindsey Romaniello (Hendrix College), Suzanne Eckert (Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University). Not pictured: Rob Jones.

At the Center for Desert Archaeology, we view Salado as a new identity or religion that resulted from extended contact between ancestral Puebloan immigrants from the Kayenta region of northeastern Arizona and local groups in the southern Southwest. These socially distant peoples lived side by side in large communities for more than a century before the arrival of the Spaniards. The story of how we came to this view has unfolded over more than a decade. Our research in the Upper Gila and field effort at Mule Creek, New Mexico, are a work in progress. This issue presents the primary research questions we are currently exploring.

To view a video presentation about Archaeology Southwest’s summer 2011 preservation archaeology field school at Mule Creek, New Mexico, click here.

Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila — Jeffery J. Clark, Center for Desert Archaeology

Test Excavations at the 3-Up Site — Deborah L. Huntley, Robert M. Jones, Katherine A. Dungan, J. Brett Hill, and Jeffery J. Clark, Center for Desert Archaeology

Fornholt and the Tularosa Frontier — Katherine A. Dungan, Center for Desert Archaeology

Ongoing Investigations at the Fornholt Site — Deborah L. Huntley and Katherine A. Dungan, Center for Desert Archaeology

Tracing the Movement of Mule Creek Obsidian — Robert M. Jones, Center for Desert Archaeology, and M. Steve Shackley, University of California, Berkeley

Mule Creek Obsidian in the Time of Salado — Robert M. Jones, Center for Desert Archaeology

The Complicated Social Landscape of the Twelfth through Fifteenth Centuries in Southwestern New Mexico — Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Simon Fraser University and Arizona State University, and Margaret C. Nelson, Arizona State University

Site Protection in the Upper Gila — Andy Laurenzi, Center for Desert Archaeology

Back Sight — William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

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