Tohono O'odham

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2021
04
May

Was Sells Red Pottery a Marker of Tohono O’odham Identity in Late Precontact Times? Archaeological and Ethnographic Perspectives

From our house to yours…The 14th season of Archaeology Café celebrates and shares Archaeology Southwest’s current Preservation Archaeology projects with you. Our staff members will bring you in on what we’re doing right now to learn more about the past and help protect special places. Join...
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2019
16
Jul

Ceremonial Shield Will Return to Acoma Pueblo

Ceremonial Shield Will Return to Acoma Pueblo A sacred ceremonial shield will be returned to the Pueblo of Acoma following a settlement agreement filed Friday afternoon in U.S. District Court. The settlement orders the EVE Auction House in Paris, France, to release the shield into U.S. custody at t...
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2019
23
Apr

Commentary: Rosemont Mine Will Be Disastrous for Tohono O'odham Sacred Lands

Commentary: Rosemont Mine Will Be Disastrous for Tohono O'odham Sacred Lands The mountainous area southeast of Tucson is sacred to the Tohono O’odham Nation. For thousands of years, our people have used these ancestral lands to reflect and pray. We gather medicinal plants and food, and bear grass...
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2017
02
Apr

The Antiquities Act Is Threatened

Editorial: The Antiquities Act Is Threatened The heart of the Antiquities Act of 1906 is a mere two sentences. But a good argument can be made that this brief law — which authorizes the president to protect “objects of historic or scientific interest” on federal lands as “national monuments...
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2016
08
Mar

A Fine Day at Himdag Ki

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (March 8, 2016)—On February 26, a group of us gathered under an expansive mesquite ramada at Himdag Ki, the Tohono O’odham Cultural Center and Museum in Topawa, Arizona. I had been invited to show the group how to make at...
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2015
22
Oct

Carrying Gila Bend to Washington and Making “National Significance” Personal

Bill Doelle, President & CEO (October 22, 2015)—As the month of September drew to a close, a group of 13 set out early on a gray Washington, D.C. morning to fulfill an educational mission. We assembled at 7:00 a.m. at the offices of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Our team memb...
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2015
21
May

Tucson: Ancient, Historic, and Modern

Doug Gann, Preservation Archaeologist and Digital Media Specialist May 20, 2015—Last Friday morning, as I left for the office, my daughter asked what I wanted for dinner that evening. (She’s learning to write, and wanted to make out a shopping list.) I told her it would depend—on whether or n...
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2014
21
Dec

Help Create a New Preservation Partnership for Tumamoc Hill

A 2,000-Year-Old Hilltop Village next to Downtown Tucson Most people living in Tucson have no idea of the cultural history embedded at Tumamoc, the large mesa behind Sentinel Peak (aka "A" Mountain). Some 2,000 years ago, the ancient desert farmers of the Early Agricultural period built a h...
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2013
07
Jul

The Museum of Northern Arizona Celebrates Annual Hopi Heritage Festival

The Museum of Northern Arizona Celebrates Annual Hopi Heritage Festival Hopi people dance to bring rainfall. On Saturday, the Hopi people shared this dance at the Hopi heritage festival at the Museum of Northern Arizona. They also shared glimpses into the history and culture of the Hopi people. Al...
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2013
21
Apr

Tohono O'odham Nation Protests Pipeline That Would Impact Cultural Sites

Tohono O'odham Nation Protests Pipeline That Would Impact Cultural Sites The Tohono O'odham Nation is taking action to officially oppose a proposed pipeline project in the Altar Valley. The Sierrita Pipeline, a Kinder Morgan project, calls for 59 miles of 36-inch pipe to deliver natural gas from ex...
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2011
03
May

The Great Bend of the Gila

This issue of Archaeology Southwest presents several thousand years of human history along the Great Bend of the Gila River.
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2011
04
Apr

Did Ancient Southwestern Peoples Trade Turquoise for Chocolate?

Like Turquoise for Chocolate? Talk about a sweet deal—prehistoric peoples of Mesoamerica may have traded chocolate for gems from the U.S. Southwest, a new study suggests. Traces of a chemical found in cacao—the main ingredient in chocolate—were found in several drinking vessels from variou...
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