Southwest archaeology

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2013
28
Nov

Back to Basics, Part 3: Broad Research Themes

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist   The archaeological culture areas I described on Wednesday are really just a means of conceptualizing similarities and differences among people living in different parts of the Southwest. These constructs do not represent cultures in the way we def...
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2013
27
Nov

Back to Basics, Part 2: Archaeological Cultures in the Southwest

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist   On Monday, I wrote about how archaeologists define culture areas, which represent geographic zones in which people were living in generally similar ways and across which people were connected through shared history and practices. Before we look at...
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2013
25
Nov

Back to Basics, Part 1

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist   As I reviewed recent posts, I thought we should take a moment to break it down for those who are interested in learning what Southwest archaeology is about, at the most basic level. This week, in three successive posts, I’ll try to summarize a...
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2012
05
Nov

Report from the 2012 National Preservation Conference

By Bill Doelle, Archaeology Southwest President & CEO The National Trust for Historic Preservation holds an annual conference in a different U.S. city each year. Last week, from October 31 through November 2, we converged on Spokane, Washington, a city of 209,000 that has a robust historic do...
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2012
29
Jun

Student Post: Reaching Out, part 2

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Elizabeth Newcomb describes our second community outreach event: I had expected that I’d be doing a lot of different things at the Preservation Archaeology field school, but I was pleasantly surprised to find out that our assignment...
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2012
28
Jun

...And More Questions Raised!

  By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant In my last post, I described three goals for our research at Fornholt this year.  In this post, I’ll discuss the second of these goals. Last year, in the two-story part of the southern room block, we found a burned storage room filled wit...
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2012
25
Jun

Student Post: For the Love of Obsidian

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Jordan Taher's encounter with the Mule Creek obsidian source has been a pilgrimage of sorts: One of the main reasons I wanted to attend the Archaeology Southwest-University of Arizona Preservation Archaeology field school at Mule Cree...
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2012
22
Jun

One Question Answered...

  By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant Somehow, we’re more than halfway through the field season—time really does fly out here!—and now it’s time to provide an update on our research. Older blog posts will give you an idea of how our fieldwork last summer shaped our unders...
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2012
21
Jun

Student Post: Reaching Out

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Andi Sei understands why we must share what we are learning with the community: Archaeology isn’t just for the academic. Public education is vital for the community and the archaeologist. This past Saturday, our field school held t...
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2012
19
Jun

Student Post: Reading the Dirt

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Kelly Sweeney and her crew are learning to "read the dirt": It is always exciting to start a new unit and uncover what lies beneath the soil. When I first arrived at the Fornholt site, I felt this exact sentiment. My crew’s goal was...
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2012
06
Jun

Student Post: Blissfully Disconnected

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Field school student Megan Smith settles in to the rhythm of camp life: I often feel that I have lost sight of what is really important in my life as I scramble to meet deadlines and constantly focus my views so nar...
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2012
04
Jun

Student Post: First Days at Mule Creek

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Our first student blog post comes from Tom Sprynczynatyk: As we drove up to the field school camp, I couldn’t help but feel some trepidation. Leaving Safford, about 50 miles southwest from Mule Creek, I could see smoke from the Whit...
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