The Power of Symbols

Flags in Civil Rights March
Monday, November 14th, 2016

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (November 14, 2016)—As an anthropologist, I think about the power of symbols, and their power to unite or divide. When I taught traditional classroom anthropology courses, this was one of the key concepts we discussed. As a young teaching assistant for Peggy Nelson (a professor in the Barrett Honors College […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

2016 Field School Wrap-Up

Leslie Excavating
Monday, July 18th, 2016

Leslie Aragon, University of Arizona, and Field Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School (July 18, 2016)—Now that the field season has drawn to a close, I’ve had a little bit of time to reflect back on all we accomplished at the Gila Farm site in the short 5 ½ weeks that we were together for the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Kickoff of Our 2016 Field School Blog Series

2016 Field School Crew
Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (June 7, 2016)—The 2016 field season brings several exciting changes for the Preservation Archaeology Field School. One of the biggest changes for us is a new excavation site. We finished our fieldwork at the Cliff phase (A.D. 1300–1450+) Dinwiddie site last summer, and have moved a few miles northeast to […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Gorod Durakov, or What’s In a Name?

Gorod Durakov
Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist (April 5, 2016)—I spent a wonderful and exhausting six days in late March as a guide for a weeklong members’ tour of Salado and Classic Hohokam archaeological sites in the valleys of southern Arizona. Bill Doelle, Lyle Balenquah, and Alan Osbourne were my co-guides. Up shortly after dawn (yes, even me, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Refugee Story, A.D. 1275

Castle Rock Pueblo
Thursday, November 19th, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (November 19, 2015)—I’m going to tell a story—as close to a true story as I can, but a story nonetheless. Seven hundred and forty years ago, groups of people fled their homes, seeking escape from political turmoil and economic hardships. A drought had stirred unrest in the already-troubled region. Old […]



Filed Under: Featured, Preservation Archaeology Blog

Ancient Engineering: “Hanging” Canals

Marijilda Mesa Canal
Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

Archaeology Southwest is honored to feature “The Prehistoric Bajada ‘Hanging’ Canals of the Safford Basin: Small Corporate Group Engineering in Southeastern Arizona,” written by James A. Neely, Professor Emeritus, University of Texas, and co-researcher Don Lancaster of Thatcher, Arizona, especially for our Preservation Archaeology blog. This update follows on Dr. Neely’s post from April 2014. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Ideologies of Inclusion

First Field School Meal
Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Alexander Ballesteros, Northern Arizona University The Southwest United States has a long history of cultural coalescence, and as a fourth-generation Arizonan, I have a firsthand glimpse at the history of group aggregations in the region. Some historic instances of cultural coalescence in Arizona include the Spanish conquest of indigenous populations and various migrations into the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Even the Smallest Piece

Perforated Plate Sherd
Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Will Russell, Field Supervisor     One of the highlights of teaching is the look of discovery and excitement on a student’s face. Recently, I was wiping sweat from my eyes and filling out paperwork amidst a cloud of dust shaken from the screens when I heard Andrew say, “Hey, Will, take a look at this!” […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Prelude to Fieldwork

Arizona State Museum Pottery Display
Monday, June 9th, 2014

Leslie Aragon, Field Supervisor Last week, we kicked off the 2014 Preservation Archaeology Field School. Students arrived in Tucson from all over the country, from Hawaii to Massachusetts, and spent a few days learning about Preservation Archaeology and Salado culture. At the Himdag Ki museum in Topawa, Arizona, students met members of the Tohono O’odham […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A View from the Edge…of Salado

Fran Reaches for an Artifact
Thursday, April 10th, 2014

By Kathryn Turney, Project Intern I have had the pleasure of being an intern for the Edge of Salado project since February of this year. It has been fun, challenging at times, and very rewarding. It has been a good learning experience, in terms of how to meet the project’s research goals while still providing […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Exploring the Edge, March 1–2

Scorpion in a Shovel
Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

By Lewis Borck, Preservation Archaeology Fellow Preparations for Edge of Salado research (click on that link to learn more) have been underway for the past month:   Excavations began two weekends ago in the Sulphur Springs Valley:   And we often had company! We continued this past weekend in the Coyote Mountains at a platform […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Peabody Coal, the Black Mesa Archaeological Project, and Repatriation Problems

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

Peabody Coal, the Black Mesa Archaeological Project, and Repatriation Problems In 1967 Peabody Energy needed to clear land it was leasing on the Navajo reservation to strip mine coal, but ancient Indian dwellings and graves were in the way. So, as required by law, it hired a team of archeologists and they dug up roughly 1.3 million […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

This Post Is Not about the Borg or Peanut-Butter Cups—Or Is It?

Peanut Butter Cup
Monday, November 4th, 2013

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator, with Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist   (November 4, 2013)—One of the most rewarding aspects of serving as the content editor of Archaeology Southwest Magazine is the continual opportunity to learn new things directly from the finest scholars. I have been fortunate to have Tobi Taylor, the previous content editor, and […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Faces of Salado?

Cliff Valley Cache
Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

By Katherine Dungan, Preservation Archaeologist In 1972, a cache of truly remarkable items—a large, wooden human figure and a slightly smaller stone human figure accompanied by animal effigies, textiles, and wooden objects—was recovered from a cave in the Cliff Valley, along the Upper Gila River in New Mexico. The objects are described in a 1978 […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Broad Coalition Supports Archaeological Preservation along the Great Bend of the Gila

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

Broad Coalition Supports Archaeological Preservation along the Great Bend of the Gila Roy and Ella Pierpoint continue a 1,500-year way of life, farming near an area awash in Hohokam and Patayan treasures. The Pierpoints, who farm the land the Hohokams cultivated, say they want Congress to shield the ancient sites from vandals, limit future development and protect the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Recent Field Visits for the Salado Preservation Initiative

Sherd Inspection
Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

By Andy Laurenzi, Southwest Field Representative   The next phase of the Salado Preservation Initiative began last month, when Bill Doelle, Jeff Clark, myself, and our new Preservation Fellow, Lewis Borck, headed to the field to visit several sites in the Sulphur Springs Valley, on the west side of the Chiricahua Mountains, and some sites […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Complicated Pattern

ASWM Vol 26 Nos. 3 & 4 cover
Monday, April 8th, 2013

Authors discuss how Archaeology Southwest’s work in southwestern New Mexico is advancing understanding of Salado. Issue editor: Deborah L. Huntley



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

Salado Preservation Initiative Launched

Thursday, December 13th, 2012

By Matt Peeples, Preservation Archaeologist As part of Archaeology Southwest’s mission to explore and protect the places of the past, we recently launched a new site protection priority planning effort, the Salado Preservation Initiative (opens as a PDF). This planning program provides a platform for describing and evaluating archaeological sites and landscapes in need of […]



Filed Under: news

Migrants and Mounds

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Archaeology Southwest Publishes Much-Anticipated “Migrants and Mounds” Preservation Archaeology in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River valley reveals a story of migration, tension, and integration in the distant past Tucson, Ariz. (November 14, 2012) — Archaeology Southwest is pleased to announce the publication of Migrants and Mounds: Classic Period Archaeology of the Lower San Pedro Valley, […]



Filed Under: Press Release

Archaeology Southwest Publishes Much-Anticipated “Migrants and Mounds”

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology) is pleased to announce the publication of Migrants and Mounds: Classic Period Archaeology of the Lower San Pedro Valley, edited by Jeffery J. Clark and Patrick D. Lyons. The richly illustrated volume presents the results of Archaeology Southwest’s long-term research program in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River […]



Filed Under: news

Salado polychrome pottery, part 2

Tonto Polychrome jar
Friday, April 6th, 2012

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist A major part of our research at Mule Creek—and in the Upper Gila region in general—is to identify compositional and stylistic variability in Salado polychrome pottery (also known as Roosevelt Red Ware) through time and across space. We are using these data to track processes of migration, population […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

The Sherds of Gamalstad: Ceramic Chronology in Mule Creek

Gamalstad Ceramic Chronology
Friday, February 3rd, 2012

By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant In a post back in October, I discussed the Late Pithouse period at Gamalstad, one of the sites we investigated during the 2009 field season. As I wrote then, we have evidence of a substantial pithouse occupation (c. A.D. 550–1000), underneath smaller Mimbres pueblo (that is, Mimbres Classic Phase, c. […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Inclusion and Exclusion

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist After spending more than twenty years scrutinizing the Salado in nearly every valley and basin in the southern part of the American Southwest, it’s time for us to step back, think deep thoughts, and hopefully come up with some profound conclusions—maybe even some with modern relevance. We believe that the […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Tracking Kayenta, Understanding Salado

Jeff Clark
Friday, September 23rd, 2011

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist Our work in Mule Creek and the Upper Gila is part of Archaeology Southwest’s long-term research project to assess the scale and impact of Kayenta migrations in the southern Arizona during the late 13th and 14th centuries A.D. The Kayenta were a relatively small “group of groups” that substantially influenced […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Preservation Archaeology in Action

Deb Huntley measuring a burned packrat midden.
Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist What can be learned about an archaeological site without digging? Quite a lot, it turns out, especially if that site has been kept in pristine condition. I recently visited such a site that is managed by the National Park Service (NPS). Although this large pueblo has been documented and […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground