Exploring and Experiencing Places of the Past and Present

Zuni Rock Art
Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

Sophia Draznin-Nagy, Mills College (June 27, 2017)—Our recent adventure to northern New Mexico included a visit to the Pueblo of Zuni on June 17. The community was preparing for the first day of a four-day ceremony tied to the summer solstice to bring in the new season. We toured the Village of the Great Kivas […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology Southwest Opposes Zinke Recommendations on Bears Ears

Bears Ears
Friday, June 16th, 2017

(June 16, 2017)—Archaeology Southwest joins sovereign tribal nations, local and national conservation organizations, and citizen stakeholders in opposing the recommendations put forth in Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s interim report on Bears Ears National Monument (BENM) dated June 10, 2017. In response to Secretary Zinke’s recommendations, William H. (Bill) Doelle, President & CEO of Archaeology Southwest, […]



Filed Under: news, Press Release

Mimbres Preservation, Pithouses, Pueblos, and Pottery

ASWM 31-1 Cover
Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Issue editors Patricia A. Gilman and Roger Anyon and contributors show how preservation intersects with the cutting edges of Mimbres archaeology today.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

The Meaning of Monument

Cedar Mesa Basketmaker Rock Art
Friday, June 9th, 2017

Aaron Wright, Preservation Archaeologist (June 11, 2017)—Monuments come in different shapes and sizes. For many, monuments bring to mind plaques or statues that commemorate some historical figure or event. It is important to recognize that places may also be monuments—from a dot on a map, as with the Four Corners Monument, or expansive tracts of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

The Antiquities Act Turns 111 – Celebrate by Protecting the Law

Sunday, June 4th, 2017

The Antiquities Act Turns 111 – Celebrate by Protecting the Law This Thursday, June 8, is an important day. It marks 111 years since President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law. We at Archaeology Southwest cannot overstate this law’s significance. Through this act, America has protected its singular landscapes and people’s stories therein. Increasingly, the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Celebrate the 111th Anniversary of the Antiquities Act—By Defending It

Sonoran Desert
Sunday, June 4th, 2017

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator (June 4, 2017)—This Thursday, June 8, is an important day. It marks 111 years since President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law. We at Archaeology Southwest cannot overstate this law’s significance. Through this act, America has protected its singular landscapes and people’s stories therein. Increasingly, the Antiquities Act is […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

New Site Protection Acquisition: The Fleming Parcel

Aaron Wright at the Fleming Parcel
Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

Aaron Wright, Preservation Archaeologist (May 30, 2017)—Another site protection success! On May 22, 2017, we closed on the Fleming parcel, 120 acres in the lower Gila River valley. We purchased 40 acres, and Gail Fleming, Trustee for the Lawrence J. and Gail Fleming Trust, donated an additional 80 acres. The parcel is a complement to […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Resolution of the Board of Directors for Archaeology Southwest in opposition to any efforts to revoke or diminish Bears Ears National Monument

Bears Ears
Wednesday, May 24th, 2017

RESOLUTION A Resolution of the Board of Directors for Archaeology Southwest in opposition to any efforts to revoke or diminish Bears Ears National Monument. Whereas, Presidential Executive Order 13792 of April 26, 2017, directs the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a review of all Presidential designations or expansions of designations under the Antiquities Act […]



Filed Under: news, Press Release

Burning Down the (Pit) House, part 1

Roof timbers under dirt burning
Friday, May 19th, 2017

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (May 19, 2017)—In 2015, volunteers joined me in building a half-scale model of a typical dwelling from the Early Agricultural period (2000 B.C.–A.D. 50) in the Tucson Basin. We built the model near our full-scale replica Hohokam pithouse at Steam Pump Ranch in Oro Valley, a public […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

For Bears Ears, Our National Monuments, and the Antiquities Act

Roosevelt at the Grand Canyon
Friday, May 12th, 2017

Bill Doelle, President & CEO (May 12, 2017)—The outraged community had the Swedish scientist arrested. The scientist, Gustav Nordenskiöld (1868–1895), had undertaken quite good archaeological excavations, by today’s standards, at cliff dwellings in southwestern Colorado’s Mesa Verde region. The trouble came in September 1891 when he tried to ship the materials back east by rail, bound […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Take Action: Stand with the Antiquities Act

Organ Pipe
Thursday, April 27th, 2017

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator (April 27, 2017)—An attack on one national monument is an attack on all national monuments. On April 26, 2017, President Trump signed an executive order requiring the Department of the Interior to review national monument designations since 1996 that are greater than 100,000 acres or that might have occurred with […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology Southwest at Tucson’s March for Science

Archaeology Southwest's Booth
Monday, April 24th, 2017

Leslie Aragon, Preservation Archaeology Fellow (April 24, 2017)—Over the weekend, thousands of people across the country came together to march, rally, and speak out for science. In Tucson, an estimated 4,000 people came out to El Presidio Park to show their support for the S.T.E.M. fields. Looking across a sea of people and their signs, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

I Took My Dremel to Vancouver

Bathroom Lab
Friday, April 7th, 2017

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (April 7, 2017)—Last week, several of us from Archaeology Southwest attended the Society for American Archaeology annual meetings in Vancouver, BC. Thousands of archaeologists migrated north and flocked to the Vancouver Convention Centre to spend five days seeing posters, forums, and 15-minute talks on virtually every archaeological topic imaginable. We […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Tan a Hide

Softening the Hide
Wednesday, March 29th, 2017

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (March 29, 2017)—In this post I will describe the process of brain-tanning, which I learned last month at Winter Count. I have to admit, though I have seen the process in parts, it always looked like more work than I wanted to do. Still, this year I […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Protecting Native Rock Art: Be a Good Guest!

Shield Petroglyph with Bullet Holes
Friday, March 3rd, 2017

Kirk Astroth, Archaeology Southwest Member and Volunteer (March 3, 2017)—For the past 7 weeks, a team of us (Jaye Smith, Carl Evertsbusch, Fran Maiuri, Lance Trask, and I) have been working under the guidance of Aaron Wright to document the 594 boulders at the Painted Rock Petroglyph Site. I have found the work invigorating, the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Shade, Cultures, and Foxes

Improvised Shade at Painted Rocks
Friday, February 17th, 2017

Carl Evertsbusch, Archaeology Southwest member and volunteer (February 17, 2017)—Gripping a pole lashed to one end of an 8×10 piece of dark plastic, I drift off into scenes of kneeling in dirt making earthshaking archaeological discoveries. With no warning a breeze hits our homemade contraption and threatens to launch my shade mate Jaye Smith (read […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Volunteerism

Jaye Smith at Painted Rocks
Thursday, February 16th, 2017

Jaye Smith, Archaeology Southwest member and volunteer (February 16, 2016)—Volunteerism—I have thought about this word and its true meaning many times over the past 4 years, and when I originally decided to devote my remaining time on this magnificent planet to volunteer full time in the archaeological sciences. Dictionary.com defines volunteerism as “the policy or […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Documenting Painted Rock Petroglyph Site

Orange Archaeologist Vest
Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

Fran Maiuri, Archaeology Southwest member and volunteer (February 14, 2017)—We’re in the middle of over 500 boulders with petroglyphs on them and we’re wearing bright orange vests that say ARCHAEOLOGIST. Five of us—Kirk Astroth, Carl Evertsbusch, Jaye Smith, and Lance Trask—are volunteering for Archaeologist Southwest, recording the Painted Rock Petroglyph site. This site is managed […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Take Action: Greater Chaco Landscape

Monday, February 6th, 2017

Paul F. Reed, Preservation Archaeologist (February 20, 2017)—DEADLINE TO COMMENT IS MIDNIGHT TONIGHT, MST, 2/20/17. (Original post dated 2/7/17 follows) First, thank you to everyone who has contacted me and Archaeology Southwest about taking action on behalf of the Greater Chaco Landscape. To review our overall goals regarding this effort, please visit the website of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Teaching Archaeology

Thank You Note
Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

Leslie Aragon, Preservation Archaeology Fellow (January 31, 2017)—A couple of weeks ago, Lewis Borck and I (along with our friend and fellow archaeologist, Ashleigh Thompson) went to the Khalsa Montessori School here in Tucson to talk about archaeology to a group of first through third graders. We had it on good authority (from Lewis’s daughter, Maya, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Facts, Biases, and How We Sift through Them

Screen Vs Blower
Friday, January 27th, 2017

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (January 27, 2016)—As you know if you read this blog often, archaeologists instinctively draw on our training in anthropology and our studies of the past when we’re trying to understand the complexity of today’s world. To my surprise, an episode in the development of anthropological theory I struggled with as […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Make a Shell Tinkler

Shell Tinkler
Thursday, January 19th, 2017

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (January 19, 2017)—Shell tinklers are a relatively common shell artifact we find in Hohokam and Salado archaeological sites in southern Arizona. Most are made of Conus shell or Olivella shell, both of which come from the Gulf of California. People strung the shells together such that they […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Incise Bone

Finished Awl Design
Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (December 22, 2016)—Last-minute holiday gift idea! Review my previous post on how to make bone awls, and then check out this post to learn how to decorate your awl. For this project, I used a large bone awl made out of an elk metacarpal. I made this […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

New Site Protection Acquisition: The Taylor Site

O'odham Tribal Members at Sobaipuri site
Wednesday, December 21st, 2016

Andy Laurenzi, Southwest Field Representative (December 21, 2016)—Beginning with a visit in 1692, Padre Eusebio Francisco Kino and various representatives of the Spanish crown traveled on several occasions along much of the San Pedro River within what is now Arizona. They encountered a number of native villages inhabited by people archaeologists call the Sobaipuri, a […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Celebrating a Mammoth Dust-Up in Bluff

Bluff Mammoth of Winter
Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

R. E. Burrillo, University of Utah San Juan County is no stranger to controversy. A divisive and tragic bust of archaeological looters took place in Blanding between 2007 and 2009. In 2014, a group of fed-up locals followed a county commissioner on an illegal “protest ride” through a popular canyon east of Blanding and Monticello that may or […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog