preservation archaeology field school

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2017
10
Nov

Veterans Day

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (November 10, 2017)—Veterans Day is sometimes an exciting day at the Archaeology Southwest office, as our downtown location puts us very close to the annual Tucson Veterans Day Parade. Getting to the office amid all the early street closures ca...
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2017
01
Nov

What We're Doing This Week

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator, and Content Editor, Archaeology Southwest Magazine (November 1, 2017)—Every so often, I ask our staff to say a few words about what they're working on that week. Here's this week's edition: Aaron Wright: I'm managing data and records fr...
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2017
01
Aug

Where the Wild Things Are

Sam Banderas, Riverside Community College (August 1, 2017)—On the first and fourth of June I went on a hike down to the San Francisco River as part of an experimental archaeology group with Allen Denoyer. We parked at the beginning of the hiking trail, shouldered on our gear, and began our trek...
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2017
26
Jul

More Mud!

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (July 26, 2017)—By the end of last year’s field school, we had started two walls, and one was up to about six layers high. We mixed the mud with our hands in basin-shaped pits and placed it onto the wall in blobs. Then we...
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2017
14
Jul

Our Valued Guests

Stacy L. Ryan, Field School Staff Member (July 14, 2017)—For most of the year, we staff members of the Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field School work on a variety of projects that focus on our research interests and areas of expertise. But for six weeks in the summer, we converge in Clif...
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2017
13
Jul

Paused in the Past Tense: The Importance of Representation in Archaeology Outreach

Emily Tarantini, Mount Holyoke College (July 13, 2017)—This June, I had the opportunity to work with archaeologist Allen Denoyer on a public outreach project at a local library in Bayard, New Mexico. Attendees of the event participated in several experimental archaeology activities such as atlatl...
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2017
12
Jul

How to Strike the Balance

Ashley Huntley, University of Cincinnati (July 12, 2017)—Before coming to the Preservation Archaeology Field School, I was having a hard time reconciling my love for archaeology and my burgeoning interest in remote sensing and soils. For a long time, I thought I would have to abandon the cause an...
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2017
11
Jul

For Posterity

Johnny Schaefer, University of Missouri (July 11, 2017)—My Intro to Archaeology instructor once told me that an Archaeologist is only as good as the notes he or she takes. (Well, actually, it wasn’t just once.) I have had that statement repeated like a mantra ever since I began my coursework in...
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2017
10
Jul

Experimental Archaeology and Stone Pipe Construction

Chris La Roche, Pima Community College (July 10, 2017)—Experimental archaeology is the practice of attempting to recreate items from the archaeological record using materials, techniques, and technologies that might have been used in the period in question. This allows us to better understand the...
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2017
05
Jul

Learning about Preservation in Archaeology

Taylor Picard, Humboldt State University (July 5, 2017)—Recognizing that archaeological resources are nonrenewable, today’s archaeologists try to preserve as much of the resource as possible, as circumstances allow. Some nondestructive techniques include ground-penetrating radar, remote-sensing...
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2017
23
Jun

Lost Art

Susannah Johnson, Utah Valley University (June 23, 2017)—Patience is a virtue that few possess. In a day of here and now, “instant” is our battle cry. With high-speed internet, fast cars, and microwaveable meals we have entrenched ourselves in a state of easy access. As the trend has moved th...
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2017
21
Jun

Sacred Datura

Karla Glasgow, California State University Los Angeles (June 21, 2017)—Datura. The Devil’s Weed. Yerba del Diablo. Jimsonweed. Nightshade. All of these names refer to a genus of potent medicinal and hallucenogenic plant. When consumed, it can even be fatal or cause paralysis. As this is my fir...
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