obsidian

Contact

Kate Sarther
Communications Director
Email | (520) 882-6946, ext. 16

 

2019
25
Jun

Obsidian Hunt

This post is one in our annual series of essays by our Preservation Archaeology Field School students. We invite you to continue following along with their experiences over the next few weeks. Alex Burden, University of Colorado Boulder (June 25, 2019)—We rode the RAV4 up along a single-lane c...
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2018
14
Jun

On the Hunt for Obsidian

Laura Rojas, Adelphi University (June 13, 2018)—On June 5, experimental archaeologist Allen Denoyer, fellow field school student Shiloh, and I spent the day in the Gila National Forest looking for obsidian in order to gain a better understanding of the process involved in flintknapping. This is...
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2016
11
Jul

Antelope Creek Obsidian

Kaitlyn Cometa, University of Delaware (July 12, 2016)—What is the first thing you think of when you hear someone refer to the obsidian at a specific source as “bomb” obsidian? Probably that you don’t want to be near it when it blows up. I however, was drawn to the idea of the “bomb” ...
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2015
16
Jul

Flakes, Points, and Little Obsidian Discs

Stacy Ryan, Lithics Lab Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School Now that excavations at the Dinwiddie site are complete, the students are focused on writing detailed summaries about what we’ve learned these past five weeks. Our days here have been incredibly full with fieldwork, ceramics ...
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2013
08
Oct

Student Research at the Dinwiddie Site: Raw Material Sources

Deb Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist   Students attending the 2013 Archaeology Southwest/University of Arizona Preservation Archaeology Field School completed several interesting and valuable research projects covering a wide range of topics, from experimental ceramics and flaked stone st...
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2012
15
Nov

Migrants and Mounds

Archaeology Southwest Publishes Much-Anticipated “Migrants and Mounds” Preservation Archaeology in southeastern Arizona’s San Pedro River valley reveals a story of migration, tension, and integration in the distant past Tucson, Ariz. (November 14, 2012) — Archaeology Southwest is pleased t...
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2012
25
Jun

Student Post: For the Love of Obsidian

  By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Jordan Taher's encounter with the Mule Creek obsidian source has been a pilgrimage of sorts: One of the main reasons I wanted to attend the Archaeology Southwest-University of Arizona Preservation Archaeology field school at Mule Cree...
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2011
23
Sep

Tracking Kayenta, Understanding Salado

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist Our work in Mule Creek and the Upper Gila is part of Archaeology Southwest’s long-term research project to assess the scale and impact of Kayenta migrations in the southern Arizona during the late 13th and 14th centuries A.D. The Kayenta were a r...
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2011
31
Aug

Follow the Center's Upper Gila Research

Team members Jeff Clark, Deb Huntley, Rob Jones, and Katherine Dungan share their Upper Gila research as it unfolds. New posts appear each Thursday.
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2011
10
Jun

New Videos - Center Archaeologists on Work in Mule Creek, New Mexico

Deborah Huntley, Rob Jones, and Katherine Dungan share their research questions and their perspectives on working in the Upper Gila River region of west-central New Mexico in these new Center-produced video segments.
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2011
29
Mar

Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila

This issue of Archaeology Southwest presents the Center's ongoing research on the twelfth through fifteenth centuries in the Upper Gila and preliminary results of field efforts in Mule Creek, New Mexico.
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2011
13
Feb

Mount Taylor Stripped of Traditional Cultural Property Designation

Mount Taylor Stripped of Traditional Cultural Property Designation It was about respect, said the Acoma, Hopi, Laguna, Navajo and Zuni tribes in mid-2008 pitching the designation of Mount Taylor as a traditional cultural property. A year later the TCP designation was a done deal, except that some...
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