A Tohono O’odham View of the Legacy in the Landscape

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Editorial: A Tohono O’odham View of the Legacy in the Landscape ‘Legacy” is a word we’re hearing a lot lately. Words and ideas are but one kind of legacy, though. For me and other American Indians, our legacy is through the land. Our history is in the land. So much of the nation’s rich history […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Salt Lake Tribune Takes a Stand for the Antiquities Act

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

Salt Lake Tribune Takes a Stand for the Antiquities Act and Our National Monuments Rob Bishop has made it clear that he would like for the Antiquities Act of 1906 to just go away. And for all those who support the law to “die.” Until one or both of those happen, though, neither the incoming president […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Temporary Halt to Fracking near Chaco Canyon Overturned

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

Temporary Halt to Fracking near Chaco Canyon Overturned An effort to temporarily halt drilling across part of one of the nation’s largest natural gas fields has been rejected by a federal appeals court, leaving environmentalists to push their case against hydraulic fracturing in district court. A coalition of environmental groups sued the Bureau of Land Management […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Utah Public Lands Initiative Clears House Committee

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Utah Public Lands Initiative Clears House Committee The House Natural Resources Committee advanced the Public Lands Initiative on Thursday, moving the bill to the full House with a week to go before Congress adjourns until after the election. The PLI, sponsored by Utah Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz, would protect part of the Bears Ears […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Don’t Blame the Salt at Chaco?

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Research Finds Salt Infiltration Was Not a Problem at Chaco Canyon Various salt compounds found deep in the soil of New Mexico’s desert may be the key to understanding how crops were cultivated in ancient Chaco Canyon – despite the backdrop of what seems an otherwise arid and desolate landscape, according to a University of Cincinnati […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Ancient Solar Storms Offer a New Method for Calibrating Dendrochronology

Sunday, August 21st, 2016

Ancient Solar Storms Offer a New Method for Calibrating Dendrochronology Archaeologists believe they have identified a new way of putting accurate dates to great events of prehistory. Rare and spectacular storms on the sun appear to have left their mark in forests and fields around the planet over the past 5,000 years. Michael Dee, of Oxford […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Explosion and Uncontrolled Fire at Oil Processing Facility 14 miles from Chaco Canyon Confirm Preservationists’ Worst Fears

Sunday, July 31st, 2016

Explosion and Uncontrolled Fire at Oil Processing Facility 14 miles from Chaco Canyon Confirm Preservationists’ Worst Fears A recent fire at an oil production site in New Mexico provided environmental advocacy groups with fodder for a long-standing argument: Federal agencies must weigh all impacts of mineral extraction before drilling begins. “These WPX Energy wells were producing […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Utah Considers Sale of State Land on Comb Ridge

Sunday, May 29th, 2016

Utah Considers Sale of State Land on Comb Ridge Officials with the Utah School and Institutional Trust Lands Administration (SITLA) are now considering a proposal to sell a 640-acre section on the southern tip of Comb Ridge in San Juan County. This scenic spot, located 6 miles west of Bluff on State Route 163, is […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Southwestern Anthropological Community Remembers Bernard “Bunny” Fontana

Sunday, April 3rd, 2016

The Southwestern Anthropological Community Remembers Bernard “Bunny” Fontana Bernard “Bunny” Fontana, a renowned scholar and prolific author in the field of Southwestern history and archaeology, died early Saturday. He was 85 years old. Fontana’s career stretched six decades. He was a cultural anthropologist, field researcher, archaeologist, historian, writer and co-founder of Patronato San Xavier, a […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

BLM Defers on Fracking Leases near Chaco Canyon

Sunday, March 27th, 2016

BLM Defers on Fracking Leases near Chaco Canyon Yesterday, the Bureau of Land Management deferred for the third time the sale of three oil and gas lease parcels and approximately 2,122 acres of federal mineral estate on Navajo allotment lands in the Greater Chaco region. A broad coalition of local and regional watchdog groups submitted comments […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Oak Flat Listed on the National Register of Historic Places

Sunday, March 20th, 2016

Oak Flat Listed on the National Register of Historic Places Opponents of a proposed copper mine at the Oak Flat campground scored a point when it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places this month – but while they won the battle, they haven’t won the war. While Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Prescott, said in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Navajo Nation Archaeology Conference Focused on Partnerships

Sunday, March 6th, 2016

Navajo Nation Archaeology Conference Focused on Partnerships The ways Navajo people and non-Navajo people relate to the archaeology of the Four Corners region served as the center of discussion during Friday’s Navajo Nation Archaeology Meeting in Shiprock. The theme for the meeting was “Cultural Heritage: Then and Now.” The meeting’s purpose was to share archaeological research relating to the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Native American Tribes Ask for Better Protection of Ancient Places on BLM Lands

Sunday, November 29th, 2015

Native American Tribes Ask for Better Protection of Ancient Places on BLM Lands A panel discussion Saturday at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center on the impacts of oil-and-gas to the land featured perspectives of prominent members of the Santa Ana and Acoma pueblos. Acoma Gov. Fred Vallo Sr. and Santa Ana official Timothy Menchego expressed […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

William A. Longacre Jr. Passes

Sunday, November 22nd, 2015

William A. Longacre Jr. Passes Professor Emeritus William Longacre passed away peacefully in Tucson, AZ, on November 18 after a short illness. Dr. Longacre will be interred in the family plot in Houghton, MI in the spring. Funeral arrangements are pending. The School of Anthropology will host a celebration of life in Tucson, also in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Public Forum to Promote Preservation of the Greater Chaco and Mesa Verde Landscapes

New Alto and Pueblo Alto
Friday, November 13th, 2015

Paul F. Reed, Preservation Archaeologist (November 13, 2015)—Today, I want to send a fairly short message via blog to our supporters and members. Archaeology Southwest and Crow Canyon are pleased to announce a public forum to promote protection of the Greater Chaco and Mesa Verde Landscapes. The event will be held on Saturday, November 21, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Crow Canyon’s Village Ecodynamics Project Clarifies Understanding of Mesa Verde

Sunday, November 8th, 2015

Crow Canyon’s Village Ecodynamics Project Clarifies Understanding of Mesa Verde Vultures carve lazy circles in the sky as a stream of tourists marches down a walkway into Colorado’s Spruce Canyon. Watching their steps, the visitors file along a series of switchbacks leading to one of the more improbable villages in North America — a warren […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Salt Lake Tribune Argues for Restoration of Federal Conservation Funding

Sunday, November 1st, 2015

Salt Lake Tribune Argues for Restoration of Federal Conservation Funding The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) was established in 1965 to invest in our nation’s land, water and wildlife heritage. For 50 years, the LWCF has helped support our parks and historic sites; conserved our forests, rivers, lakes and wildlife habitat; and provided access […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Archaeology Southwest in D.C. to Support Great Bend of the Gila

Sunday, October 25th, 2015

Archaeology Southwest in D.C. to Support Great Bend of the Gila On September 29, 2015, Archaeology Southwest’s President and CEO, Bill Doelle, joined tribal officials and other heritage organizations to make the case for the Great Bend of the Gila National Monument. Three legislators offered support for the bill Rep. Grijalva plans to reintroduce in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Western State Governments Pass “Dubious” Legislation Concerning the Transfer of Federal Lands

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

Western State Governments Pass “Dubious” Legislation Concerning the Transfer of Federal Lands For the last several decades, efforts to transfer the oversight of federal land to states has arisen only in isolated legislative initiatives that eventually died out. But in a mad rush since 2012, 10 of the 11 Western states have commissioned or considered studies to […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

How Far Did They Carry Those Deer? And Where Did All Those Turkeys Come from?

Deer Running Across Path
Tuesday, April 28th, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist April 28, 2015—I recently received the good news that a new project we’re starting here at Archaeology Southwest has been funded by the National Science Foundation (BCS-1460385). I’ll be working with Jeffrey Ferguson, an archaeological chemistry expert from the Archaeometry Laboratory at the University of Missouri Research Reactor, who has […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Research Reveals High Incidence of Violence around Ancient Mesa Verde

Sunday, August 10th, 2014

Research Reveals High Incidence of Violence around Ancient Mesa Verde It’s a given that, in numbers terms, the 20th century was the most violent in world history, with civil wars, purges and two world wars killing as many as 200 million people. But on a per-capita basis, Washington State University archaeologist Tim Kohler has documented a particularly bloody […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Pecos Conference Begins Thursday, August 7

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

Pecos Conference Begins Thursday, August 7 The Pecos Conference is an annual conference of archaeologists which is held in the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico. Each August, archaeologists gather under open skies somewhere in the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico. http://bit.ly/1o4cC7x NPR Explores History and Commerce at Santa Fe’s Indian Market The 93rd […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

President Obama Declares New National Monument in Southwest New Mexico

Sunday, May 25th, 2014

President Obama Declares New National Monument in Southwest New Mexico President Obama’s record on public lands protection has been spotty – as of January 2013, he’d opened more than twice as many acres to drilling as he’d conserved. Lately, though, the POTUS has been on a bit of a roll. Over the last 16 months, Obama has […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

This Post Is Not about the Borg or Peanut-Butter Cups—Or Is It?

Peanut Butter Cup
Monday, November 4th, 2013

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator, with Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist   (November 4, 2013)—One of the most rewarding aspects of serving as the content editor of Archaeology Southwest Magazine is the continual opportunity to learn new things directly from the finest scholars. I have been fortunate to have Tobi Taylor, the previous content editor, and […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Movement Is Life

Canyons of the Pajarito Plateau
Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

By Andy Laurenzi, Southwest Field Representative   “Movement is life. Movement is seen everywhere… Movement was characteristic of our ancestors, who moved across the landscape like the clouds across the sky.” —Tessy Naranjo, Santa Clara Pueblo, quoted on the Bandelier National Monument website Last week, I experienced mind-numbing deep preservation at the New Mexico Archaeological […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog