Karen Schollmeyer

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2020
29
Sep

A Resource for Zooarchaeology and Conservation Biology

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School (September 29, 2020)—I’m happy to share news of a new publication some of you may be interested in. Wildlife biologist Stephen MacDonald and I just published Faunal Remains from Archaeology Sit...
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2020
23
Jun

What Do Geoarchaeologists Do?

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School (June 23, 2020)—Today's (Un)Field School presentation is by internationally recognized geoscientist Gary Huckleberry. We've been fortunate to have Gary come to the Preservation Archaeology Field ...
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2020
22
Jun

Welcome to (Un)Field School

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School (June 22, 2020)—Is your tent (blanket fort?) set up? That has to come first. Next is your camp chair. Pick a good spot. You have enough water? OK. Usually at this time of year, this blog featu...
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2020
26
May

Congratulations to Graduating Field School Alumni

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (May 26, 2020)—For the last six years, the end of May has meant the beginning of field school season. Every year, I’ve spent this time trying to squeeze in time to enjoy the last cool days of spring and the too-short season of ironwood and sagua...
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2020
27
Apr

For Kids: Books about the Past

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (April 27, 2020)—This spring of “shelter in place” has brought many unexpected things. For some of us, time away from other activities has meant more time to read, and perhaps more time to explore interests that our busy schedules previously d...
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2020
23
Mar

2020 Preservation Archaeology Field School Canceled

Tucson, Ariz. (March 23, 2020)—The 2020 Archaeology Southwest-University of Arizona Preservation Archaeology Field School has been canceled. Director Karen Schollmeyer has issued the following statement: “It is with great regret that we share the news of the field school’s cancelation. The ...
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2020
05
Mar

Life of The Gila: Mogollon—It’s Complicated

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (March 6, 2020)—Graduate school social life is notorious for this: groups of nerds spending a lot of time sitting around arguing passionately about very, very specific implications of certain words that people in other fields either use in a compl...
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2019
27
Sep

Eight Sites in 48 Hours

Stacy Ryan, Preservation Archaeologist (September 27, 2019)—I recently joined my Archaeology Southwest coworkers on our annual staff retreat, which entails exploring archaeological sites, connecting to landscapes, and learning a few new skills. This year, we experienced Salado and Mimbres arc...
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2019
22
Sep

Archaeology Southwest at the Gila River Festival

Gila River Archaeology and Ancient Technologies Field Trip with Karen Schollmeyer, Leslie Aragon, and Allen Denoyer September 22, 1:00–5:00 p.m. Fee: $20, first come, first served. Purchase your ticket here. Meet at the Murray Ryan Visitor Center at 12:45 p.m., and drive to the Gila Riv...
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2019
29
May

The Students Are Here!

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (May 29, 2019)—It’s late May in Tucson, and that means saguaro and ironwood blossoms, rising temperatures, and field school season! Not long ago, Jeff Clark and I received the very happy news that our Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field Sc...
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2019
29
Apr

Archaeology Southwest at the 2019 SAA Meeting (Recap)

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (April 29, 2019)—Many of us here at Archaeology Southwest recently returned from a busy week at the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) annual meeting. This year’s meeting took place in Albuquerque, New Mexico, so there was an unusually high ...
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2019
14
Mar

The Importance of Dead Bunnies in Mimbres and Salado Archaeology in Southwest New Mexico

How might farmers maintain local access to wild animals for food and other uses for over a thousand years? How might people from different cultural traditions come together to form lasting multiethnic communities? How can the archaeology of southwestern New Mexico from AD 500 to 1450 help us underst...
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