Celebrating National Park Week

Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (April 19, 2017)—Happy National Park Week! This week, April 15–23, is a nationwide celebration of these public lands and the cultural and natural heritage they protect. Many of us here at Archaeology Southwest spend a lot of time in national parks (and monuments too). Our work takes us to beautiful […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Where Are They Now? Part 2

Alexandra Norwood
Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (March 1, 2016)—This is the second of two posts checking in with a few of our recent field school alumni to see what they’re up to now. Although we’ve been focusing on anthropological career paths in this series, I’ve also enjoyed watching many former students go on to apply their […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Rewarding Award

2015 Field School
Thursday, February 25th, 2016

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (February 25, 2016)—Jeff Clark and I recently received the happy news that our Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field School has received three years of student funding from the National Science Foundation’s (NSF) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) program (Award 1560465). REU programs are a little different from many NSF grants […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Refugee Story, A.D. 1275

Castle Rock Pueblo
Thursday, November 19th, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (November 19, 2015)—I’m going to tell a story—as close to a true story as I can, but a story nonetheless. Seven hundred and forty years ago, groups of people fled their homes, seeking escape from political turmoil and economic hardships. A drought had stirred unrest in the already-troubled region. Old […]



Filed Under: Featured, Preservation Archaeology Blog

Gopher Jaws and the Past

Karen Measuring Specimen
Friday, October 2nd, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (October 2, 2015)—I spent this week in beautiful southwestern Colorado working on the first phase of a new research project using animal bone chemistry to examine how people’s access to food animals changed over time in the Mesa Verde area. I wrote about this project on our blog a few […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Wish Granted

Mimbres Bowl - Bighorn Sheep Hunter
Monday, August 31st, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist My colleague Mike Diehl and I recently heard the good news that we’ve received a National Science Foundation grant (BCS-1524079). When I told my family about it at dinner that night, my youngest daughter asked what a “grant” was. I told her that when scientists want to study something we […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

What We’re Doing at the 2015 Field School

Measuring Adobe Room
Thursday, June 18th, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist As you can tell if you’re following Archaeology Southwest on Facebook, our 2015 field season is off and running! This year, as in the past, students are rotating through experiences in excavation, archaeological survey, field laboratory analysis, and experimental archaeology. Our twelve undergraduates and two graduate students have come together […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Southwestern Archaeology Provides Insights on Disaster Recovery

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Southwestern Archaeology Provides Insights on Disaster Recovery Following a natural disaster, vulnerability to food shortage appears to depend more on a group’s ability to migrate and its positive relationships with other groups than on resource factors. That’s according to a research team led by Arizona State University archaeologist Margaret Nelson. http://bit.ly/1hYlbv1 – Phys.Org Early Agriculture in the Southwest […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila

Tuesday, March 29th, 2011

This issue of Archaeology Southwest presents the Center’s ongoing research on the twelfth through fifteenth centuries in the Upper Gila and preliminary results of field efforts in Mule Creek, New Mexico.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?