Dinwiddie site

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2016
22
Aug

Where Most Research Happens

Katherine Dungan, Preservation Archaeologist (August 19, 2016)—Odds are good that when you think of archaeology, you’re thinking of an outdoor activity, whether that’s a bunch of dust-covered researchers poking around in square holes or just you, experiencing a place on the landscape with a...
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2016
28
Apr

The Students Are Coming!

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (April 28, 2016)—Our 2016 Preservation Archaeology Field School is only a month away! For me, late April brings a list of quirky archaeological tasks, such as ordering thousands of very specific plastic bags for artifact curation and re...
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2015
23
Jul

2015 Field School Wrap-Up

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Field School Co-Director and Preservation Archaeologist (July 23, 2015)—The end of the Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field School is always a bittersweet time, as students and staff members say goodbye to the teammates we’ve worked and lived with for six very inte...
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2015
16
Jul

Flakes, Points, and Little Obsidian Discs

Stacy Ryan, Lithics Lab Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School Now that excavations at the Dinwiddie site are complete, the students are focused on writing detailed summaries about what we’ve learned these past five weeks. Our days here have been incredibly full with fieldwork, ceramics ...
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2015
14
Jul

The Sirens

Dushyant Naresh, Vassar College Eyelids slowly wilt as the soothing hum of the car engine lulls me to sleep. The rising sun casts a golden glow across the endless landscape, with subtle magentas, yellows, and blues fusing together the feathery clouds. Desert grasses and prickly pear cacti blanket t...
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2015
13
Jul

Learning the Landscape

Barry Price Steinbrecher, Survey Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School The 2015 survey component of the field school primarily focused on surveying land on the Pitchfork Ranch in the Burro Mountains south of Silver City. The ranch owners generously hosted us as we hiked our way through ...
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2015
25
Jun

Welcome to the Grand Ballroom

By Will Russell, Ceramics Lab Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School From what I gather, blog posts are supposed to be insightful, so I’ll apologize up front. This isn’t going to solve any of life’s riddles. Rather, it’s more an expression of interpretive frustration. You see, we s...
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2015
18
Jun

What We're Doing at the 2015 Field School

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist As you can tell if you're following Archaeology Southwest on Facebook, our 2015 field season is off and running! This year, as in the past, students are rotating through experiences in excavation, archaeological survey, field laboratory analysis, ...
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2015
01
Jun

Preparations

Leslie Aragon, Excavation Director and University of Arizona Doctoral Program The beginning of the summer field school season is always an exciting time of year. Every year, the staff of the Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology (UGPA) field school (a partnership between Archaeology Southwest and ...
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2015
03
Feb

What I'm Doing This Week: Karen Schollmeyer

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist   This week, I am finishing up faunal analysis (animal remains) from Jakob Sedig's excavations at Woodrow Ruin in the Upper Gila area. He had a field project there in 2012–2013 for his dissertation work. It's interesting because it's just a fe...
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2014
30
Jun

A Lesson Quickly Learned

Maxwell Forton, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student A lesson quickly learned: not every excavation is going to unearth the find of the century. All too often, a unit is going to fail to meet your hopes and expectations. My group’s excavations atop the hill overlooking the Dinwiddie site...
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2014
26
Jun

Archaeology in the Southwestern and Eastern United States

Alex Covert, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student I participated in a field school in Virginia last summer, and that experience was quite different from the one I’m having in New Mexico this summer. Through these two experiences, I have realized that archaeology varies greatly depending ...
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