Center for Desert Archaeology

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2015
15
Oct

Deep Roots and Archaeological Obsession

Between now and October 17, 2015, Archaeology Southwest is participating in the Archaeological Institute of America's celebration of International Archaeology Day (10/17/15) by sharing blog posts about why—or how—we became archaeologists. Today we feature Paul Reed, Preservation Archaeologist an...
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2015
13
Oct

A Long and Winding Road

Between now and October 17, 2015, Archaeology Southwest is participating in the Archaeological Institute of America's celebration of International Archaeology Day (10/17/15) by sharing blog posts about why—or how—we became archaeologists. Today we feature Leslie Aragon, frequent collaborator, Ph...
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2012
08
Jan

The Center for Desert Archaeology is Now Archaeology Southwest

Editor's Note The Center for Desert Archaeology is now Archaeology Southwest. We’ve changed our name, but not the important work we do. Southwest Archaeology Today continues to bring you the latest news in regional archaeology every Monday morning. Let us know what you think of our fresh look! Th...
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2012
02
Jan

Center for Desert Archaeology Is Now Archaeology Southwest

Tucson-based Nonprofit Explores and Protects Region’s Ancient Places Tucson, Ariz. (January 3, 2012)—The Center for Desert Archaeology is pleased to announce that it has changed its name to Archaeology Southwest. Known to archaeology enthusiasts and professionals for its flagship quarterly, Arch...
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2012
02
Jan

Center for Desert Archaeology Is Now Archaeology Southwest

Tucson-based Nonprofit Explores and Protects Region’s Ancient Places Tucson, Ariz. (January 3, 2012)—The Center for Desert Archaeology is pleased to announce that it has changed its name to Archaeology Southwest. Known to archaeology enthusiasts and professionals for its flagship quarterly, Arch...
more
2011
23
Nov

Talking Turkey: Unexpected Encounters with New World Domesticates

By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant With Thanksgiving nearly upon us, we thought that it would be fun to share with our readers our own memorable turkey experience, as captured on film when we were recording Archaeology Southwest’s Mule Creek videos. But first, a bit of background...
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2011
18
Nov

Learning from Pottery, Part 1: Dating

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist When an archaeologist says that a site was inhabited, say, during the late 1200s A.D., how does he or she know that? There are many methods used to date archaeological sites. Some, like radiocarbon dating of materials like burned wood or ...
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2011
08
Nov

Inclusion and Exclusion

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist After spending more than twenty years scrutinizing the Salado in nearly every valley and basin in the southern part of the American Southwest, it’s time for us to step back, think deep thoughts, and hopefully come up with some profound conclusion...
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2011
19
Oct

Even Farther Underground: The Pithouses of Mule Creek

By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant As you know from previous posts, our work in the Upper Gila focuses on the Kayenta and Salado migrations of the late 13th through mid-15th centuries and on the 13th century occupation at the Fornholt site, where we worked this past summer. Mule Cr...
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2011
12
Oct

What does a nuclear reactor have to do with prehistoric pottery?

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Every once in a while, my research requires me to do something a little out of the ordinary. For example, this spring I spent several days at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) in Columbia. I was there to analyze ceramic com...
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2011
05
Oct

A Day’s Excavation in 2 Minutes

By Rob Jones, Preservation Fellow This summer, during our work at Fornholt, we were lucky enough to be joined by Josh Gilbrech, a photographer from Tucson. He took a time-lapse video of excavations in progress at the deep test unit on the two-story section of the site. Josh’s video gives...
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2011
23
Sep

Tracking Kayenta, Understanding Salado

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist Our work in Mule Creek and the Upper Gila is part of Archaeology Southwest’s long-term research project to assess the scale and impact of Kayenta migrations in the southern Arizona during the late 13th and 14th centuries A.D. The Kayenta were a r...
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