Deep Roots and Archaeological Obsession

Paul Reed at Rowe, 1984
Thursday, October 15th, 2015

Between now and October 17, 2015, Archaeology Southwest is participating in the Archaeological Institute of America’s celebration of International Archaeology Day (10/17/15) by sharing blog posts about why—or how—we became archaeologists. Today we feature Paul Reed, Preservation Archaeologist and leader of Archaeology Southwest’s efforts to address oil and gas exploration in the Greater Chacoan Landscape. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Long and Winding Road

Tuesday, October 13th, 2015

Between now and October 17, 2015, Archaeology Southwest is participating in the Archaeological Institute of America’s celebration of International Archaeology Day (10/17/15) by sharing blog posts about why—or how—we became archaeologists. Today we feature Leslie Aragon, frequent collaborator, Ph.D. student at the University of Arizona School of Anthropology, and Field Director of the Preservation Archaeology […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

The Center for Desert Archaeology is Now Archaeology Southwest

Sunday, January 8th, 2012

Editor’s Note The Center for Desert Archaeology is now Archaeology Southwest. We’ve changed our name, but not the important work we do. Southwest Archaeology Today continues to bring you the latest news in regional archaeology every Monday morning. Let us know what you think of our fresh look! The Center for Desert Archaeology is Now […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Center for Desert Archaeology Is Now Archaeology Southwest

Mule Creek
Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Tucson-based Nonprofit Explores and Protects Region’s Ancient Places Tucson, Ariz. (January 3, 2012)—The Center for Desert Archaeology is pleased to announce that it has changed its name to Archaeology Southwest. Known to archaeology enthusiasts and professionals for its flagship quarterly, Archaeology Southwest Magazine, the Tucson-based nonprofit organization has spent thirty years exploring and protecting the […]



Filed Under: news

Center for Desert Archaeology Is Now Archaeology Southwest

Logo
Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Tucson-based Nonprofit Explores and Protects Region’s Ancient Places Tucson, Ariz. (January 3, 2012)—The Center for Desert Archaeology is pleased to announce that it has changed its name to Archaeology Southwest. Known to archaeology enthusiasts and professionals for its flagship quarterly, Archaeology Southwest Magazine, the Tucson-based nonprofit organization has spent thirty years exploring and protecting the […]



Filed Under: news, Press Release

Talking Turkey: Unexpected Encounters with New World Domesticates

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011

With Thanksgiving nearly upon us, we thought that it would be fun to share with our readers our own memorable turkey experience, as captured on film when we were recording Archaeology Southwest’s Mule Creek videos



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Learning from Pottery, Part 1: Dating

Friday, November 18th, 2011

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist When an archaeologist says that a site was inhabited, say, during the late 1200s A.D., how does he or she know that? There are many methods used to date archaeological sites. Some, like radiocarbon dating of materials like burned wood or corn, measure the age of a sample directly […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Inclusion and Exclusion

Tuesday, November 8th, 2011

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist After spending more than twenty years scrutinizing the Salado in nearly every valley and basin in the southern part of the American Southwest, it’s time for us to step back, think deep thoughts, and hopefully come up with some profound conclusions—maybe even some with modern relevance. We believe that the […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Even Farther Underground: The Pithouses of Mule Creek

Wednesday, October 19th, 2011

By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant As you know from previous posts, our work in the Upper Gila focuses on the Kayenta and Salado migrations of the late 13th through mid-15th centuries and on the 13th century occupation at the Fornholt site, where we worked this past summer. Mule Creek’s archaeological record stretches back even […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

What does a nuclear reactor have to do with prehistoric pottery?

Wednesday, October 12th, 2011

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist Every once in a while, my research requires me to do something a little out of the ordinary. For example, this spring I spent several days at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) in Columbia. I was there to analyze ceramic compositional data collected at the MURR Archaeometry […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

A Day’s Excavation in 2 Minutes

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

By Rob Jones, Preservation Fellow This summer, during our work at Fornholt, we were lucky enough to be joined by Josh Gilbrech, a photographer from Tucson. He took a time-lapse video of excavations in progress at the deep test unit on the two-story section of the site. Josh’s video gives you a sense of the […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Tracking Kayenta, Understanding Salado

Jeff Clark
Friday, September 23rd, 2011

By Jeff Clark, Preservation Archaeologist Our work in Mule Creek and the Upper Gila is part of Archaeology Southwest’s long-term research project to assess the scale and impact of Kayenta migrations in the southern Arizona during the late 13th and 14th centuries A.D. The Kayenta were a relatively small “group of groups” that substantially influenced […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Preservation Archaeology in Action

Deb Huntley measuring a burned packrat midden.
Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

By Deborah L. Huntley, Preservation Archaeologist What can be learned about an archaeological site without digging? Quite a lot, it turns out, especially if that site has been kept in pristine condition. I recently visited such a site that is managed by the National Park Service (NPS). Although this large pueblo has been documented and […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Mapping the Past

Lindsey, one of our volunteers, draws a wall segment map at Fornholt in 2010.
Thursday, September 8th, 2011

By Katherine A. Dungan, Research Assistant In our posts during the field season, we mentioned various aspects of Fornholt’s site layout—that it has northern and southern room blocks, two-story sections, a large depression in the southern room block—but we never posted a map of the site. I haven’t added our 2011 excavations to the master […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Follow the Center’s Upper Gila Research

Excavations at Mule Creek by Henry Wallace - Copyright 2011
Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

Team members Jeff Clark, Deb Huntley, Rob Jones, and Katherine Dungan share their Upper Gila research as it unfolds. New posts appear each Thursday.



Filed Under: Featured

Mule Creek, Writ Large

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

By Rob Jones, Preservation Fellow  



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

The Salinas Province

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 25 No. 2
Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

This issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine explores the themes of continuity, connectivity, conflict, and colonization in the Salinas region of New Mexico.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

Student Post: Chaco Canyon Field Trip

Friday, August 26th, 2011

Early on a Friday morning, the students of the Mule Creek Field School dragged themselves from their tents and piled into the Suburban and the fifteen-passenger van. After an eventful drive in very close quarters—a trip that was supposed to take seven hours, but ended up taking ten due to a tire blowing out on […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Student Post: Public Outreach in Archaeology

Wednesday, August 10th, 2011

Public outreach is often an overlooked aspect of archaeology. The general public outside of the archaeological community plays an integral part in the work that we do, by giving us access to sites and helping to preserve them. It is also important for archaeologists to share their work with the public in order to explain […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Innovative Virtual Exhibit to Explore Chaco’s Legacy

Conjectural Reconstruction of Aztec Great Kiva
Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Tucson, AZ (August 4, 2011)—Center for Desert Archaeology Preservation Archaeologists Paul F. Reed and Doug Gann have been awarded a $150,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to digitally interpret recent archaeological findings from the Middle San Juan region of northwestern New Mexico. The funding comes through a special program at NSF, Communicating Research […]



Filed Under: news

Student Post: Anthropology Across the U.S. – Regional Variation in Archaeological Questions and Methods

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

One of the reasons I was most excited for this field school—aside from the charm of the Upper Gila and the completely foreign ways of life I was told I’d encounter every day—was because it gave me a chance to compare how archaeology was practiced across regions, particularly within the U.S. and North America. Fortunately, […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Center President Doelle Interviewed on The Buckmaster Show

Center president Bill Doelle
Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Dr. William H. Doelle, the Center for Desert Archaeology’s President and CEO, joined Tucson radio host Bill Buckmaster on Tuesday, June 28, 2011. Doelle and Buckmaster discussed the Center’s work in preservation archaeology and ongoing work at Chaco Canyon. To listen to the interview, click here.



Filed Under: news

Introducing Kathleen Bader

Tuesday, June 21st, 2011

Please join us in welcoming Membership Assistant Kathleen Bader to the Center family. Kathleen came aboard in May 2011. Kathleen brings several years of experience with nonprofit institutions and membership programs. An accomplished musician and composer, she moved to Tucson after falling in love with the Sonoran Desert. You can read more about Kathleen here. […]



Filed Under: Featured, news

Still Dusty: Archaeology of the Day

Thursday, June 16th, 2011

                            One of our major research questions for the summer is the large depression in the center of the south room block at Fornholt.  We are currently calling this the plaza/kiva—both types of communal architecture have precedents in this area. In the kiva fill […]



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground

Still Dusty: Archaeology of the Day

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

A unit excavated into the southern room block has produced a substantial quantity of burnt corn—not a cob or two, but entire lumps of fused, carbonized corn. The kernels are still visible due to carbonization from intense heat.



Filed Under: Mule Creek Underground