Utah Legislature Protests Bears Ears Designation

Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Utah Legislature Protests Bears Ears Designation Star-filled nights and natural quiet, deafening silence. Pinyon-juniper woodlands, blackbrush, rabbitbrush, bitterbrush. Mule deer, coyote, porcupine, skunk. Diversity of soils, aka dirt. These are some of the many natural features highlighted in former President Barack Obama’s recent proclamation designating Bears Ears National Monument, setting aside 1.3 million ares of public […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

New Data on the Domestication of Maize

Sunday, November 27th, 2016

New Data on the Domestication of Maize According to an international team of scientists who have sequenced the genome of a 5,310-year-old maize cob from the Tehuacan Valley, the maize (Zea mays) grown in central Mexico more than five millennia ago was genetically more similar to modern maize than to its wild counterpart. Scientists have long […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Can National Monuments Be Dissolved?

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

Can National Monuments Be Dissolved? As his presidential tenure winds down in the coming weeks, Barack Obama is expected to decide whether to designate some proposed national monuments, including Bears Ears in Utah and two others on Utah’s borders with neighboring states. But Donald Trump’s surprise victory in the race to succeed Obama likely changes the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Archaeology Café Returns

Archaeology Cafe -- Featured
Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator (September 22, 2016)—Autumn has always been my favorite season. Transplanted to Tucson from Chicago 25 years ago, I’ve come to appreciate the more subtle signs of the season here—raking light, denser traffic, Halloween costume ideas that don’t incorporate a coat… And, for the past eight years, autumn also means Archaeology […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Navajo Nation Archaeology Conference Focused on Partnerships

Sunday, March 6th, 2016

Navajo Nation Archaeology Conference Focused on Partnerships The ways Navajo people and non-Navajo people relate to the archaeology of the Four Corners region served as the center of discussion during Friday’s Navajo Nation Archaeology Meeting in Shiprock. The theme for the meeting was “Cultural Heritage: Then and Now.” The meeting’s purpose was to share archaeological research relating to the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Original American Revolution

Sunday, October 4th, 2015

The Original American Revolution The Pueblo Revolt is a complicated narrative. However this narrative, though it is complex, came up in a protest by a group of Native people on the Santa Fe Plaza on Friday, September 11. The peaceful demonstration was held by over a dozen people holding signs during the Entrada, the annual re-enactment of conquistador Don […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Ancient Southwestern Peoples Enjoyed Caffeine

Sunday, September 13th, 2015

Dr. Patrica Crown’s Research on Ancient Caffeinated Drinks Reveals New Insights on Ancient Life in the Southwest People were hankering for a jolt of caffeine more than a thousand years ago, but the drinks were a lot different than the Starbucks espresso or can of soda we gulp down today. New research has found that inhabitants […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Western State Governments Pass “Dubious” Legislation Concerning the Transfer of Federal Lands

Sunday, May 3rd, 2015

Western State Governments Pass “Dubious” Legislation Concerning the Transfer of Federal Lands For the last several decades, efforts to transfer the oversight of federal land to states has arisen only in isolated legislative initiatives that eventually died out. But in a mad rush since 2012, 10 of the 11 Western states have commissioned or considered studies to […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

San Carlos Apache Lead Fight Against Mining at Oak Flat

Sunday, February 8th, 2015

San Carlos Apache Lead Fight Against Mining at Oak Flat Dozens of people sang, danced and prayed outside of the San Carlos Apache tribe’s office on Thursday morning before heading out on a 44-mile journey in an attempt to protect their ancestral lands at Oak Flat campground. The protesters organized the march to express their anger […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

A Chance for Public Comment on the Fracking of the Chacoan Landscape

Sunday, February 1st, 2015

A Chance for Public Comment on the Fracking of the Chacoan Landscape The 10-member Farmington District RAC advises the Secretary of the Interior, through the BLM, on a variety of planning and management issues associated with public land management in the BLM’s Farmington District. Planned agenda items include: opening remarks from the BLM Farmington District […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Hester Davis Passes

Sunday, January 4th, 2015

Hester Davis Passes  We mourn the recent passing of Hester Davis, considered a national treasure by the archaeological community. She served as the Arkanas State Archaeologist from the creation of the position, in 1967, until her retirement in 1999. For many years, she also taught Public Archaeology at the University of Arkanas, retiring as full […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Southwestern Archaeology Provides Insights on Disaster Recovery

Sunday, March 9th, 2014

Southwestern Archaeology Provides Insights on Disaster Recovery Following a natural disaster, vulnerability to food shortage appears to depend more on a group’s ability to migrate and its positive relationships with other groups than on resource factors. That’s according to a research team led by Arizona State University archaeologist Margaret Nelson. http://bit.ly/1hYlbv1 – Phys.Org Early Agriculture in the Southwest […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Sacred Objects Treated with Respect on the Trip Back to Hopi and Apache Lands

Sunday, February 23rd, 2014

Sacred Objects Treated with Respect on the Trip Home to Hopi and Apache Two dozen ceremonial items bought last year at auction in France are set to return to Arizona in a way that pays reverence to the beliefs of American Indian tribes… That means shipping the sacred items free of plastics, bubble wrap or other […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Arizona Republic Urges Progress on Archaeological Monuments Expansion

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

Arizona Republic Urges Progress on Archaeological Monuments Expansion If Arizona were an ugly state, it might be different. There might be more urgency to protect precious natural and archaeological wonders. Instead, efforts to expand Saguaro National Park and Casa Grande Ruins National Monument are stalled, and the expansion of Petrified Forest National Park authorized by Congress in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Annenberg Foundation’s Rescue of Hopi Friends: Cultural Altruism or Bad Precedent?

Sunday, January 5th, 2014

Hopi Perspective on Annenberg Purchase After two failed lawsuits in French courts this year to stop auctions of sacred objects, the Native American Hopi tribe had a small victory on December 10 when the Los Angeles-based philanthropic organization the Annenberg Foundation announced that it had stepped up in the second auction to buy 21 Hopi items, along […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Reinventing the West – Recreation vs. Extraction

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Reinventing the West A strange thing happened in Escalante, Utah, during the government shutdown last fall. The town, a remote community of fewer than 800 souls perched on a high desert plain around a trickle of water called the Escalante River, is surrounded on all sides by the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, two million federally […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Peabody Coal, the Black Mesa Archaeological Project, and Repatriation Problems

Sunday, December 22nd, 2013

Peabody Coal, the Black Mesa Archaeological Project, and Repatriation Problems In 1967 Peabody Energy needed to clear land it was leasing on the Navajo reservation to strip mine coal, but ancient Indian dwellings and graves were in the way. So, as required by law, it hired a team of archeologists and they dug up roughly 1.3 million […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Outrage Expressed over Second Paris Auction of Objects Sacred to Hopi Peoples

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

Outrage Expressed over Second Paris Auction of Objects Sacred to Hopi Peoples Activists vowed Thursday to block the proposed sale of sacred objects originating from Arizona’s Hopi tribe at a Paris auction, just months after a similar controversy stoked outrage. Tribal people’s advocacy group Survival International said it would go to court in the French capital on […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Story of Florence Lister: Heroine of Southwestern Archaeology

Sunday, November 17th, 2013

The Story of Florence Lister: Heroine of Southwestern Archaeology A woman who has inspired several generations of archaeologists apparently is not content to rest on her laurels. At the seemingly advanced age of 93, she’s hard at work on a paper to help settle a controversy surrounding a kiva at Aztec National Monument in New […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Park Closures Divert Tourists to Native Lands

Sunday, October 6th, 2013

Park Closures Divert Tourists to Native Lands Keith Riddle and Merilyn Lassman had planned to celebrate their retirement with a visit to the Grand Canyon — “a lifelong dream of ours,” she said. But because of the government shutdown, and the closing of the entire national park system, they found themselves instead in this village […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Bipartisan Effort to Expand Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Gathers Momentum in Congress

Sunday, September 15th, 2013

Bill to Expand Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Reintroduced The boundaries of the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument could expand under a House bill. U.S. Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick a Democrat, has introduced the Casa Grande Ruins National Monument Boundary Modification Act of 2013, and if approved, the measure would transfer several pieces of land from various agencies to […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Did Protesting the Sale of Sacred Objects Compound the Sacrilege and Increase Auction Profits?

Sunday, April 28th, 2013

Did Protesting the Sale of Sacred Objects Compound the Sacrilege and Increase Auction Profits? I used to work in a Native arts gallery in Tucson. I quickly learned potential buyers of Native art want a story to go with their purchase. The better the story, the quicker the sale. The articulate pleas to stop the auction and […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Groundbreaking Study on Ancient Southwestern Social Networks to be Published by National Academy of Sciences

Sunday, March 31st, 2013

Groundbreaking Study on Ancient Southwestern Social Networks to be Published by National Academy of Sciences Archaeology Southwest is pleased to announce the publication of “Transformation of social networks in the late pre-Hispanic US Southwest,” by Barbara J. Mills, Jeffery J. Clark, Matthew A. Peeples, W. R. Haas, Jr., John M. Roberts, Jr., J. Brett Hill, Deborah L. Huntley, Lewis Borck, Ronald L. Breiger, Aaron […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Director of Zuni Museum Comments on Upcoming Auction of 71 Hopi and Zuni Masks

Sunday, March 17th, 2013

Director of Zuni Museum Comments on Upcoming Auction of 71 Hopi and Zuni Masks If the shameless business of dealing in looted antiquities and the bad karma that goes with it isn’t enough, let me say to the auctioneers and possible purchasers of the 71 Hopi and Zuni masks to be auctioned by Neret-Minet in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Chocolate in the Southwest by AD 800?

Sunday, January 27th, 2013

Chocolate in the Southwest by AD 800? They were humble farmers who grew corn and dwelt in subterranean pit houses. But the people who lived 1200 years ago in a Utah village known as Site 13, near Canyonlands National Park in Utah, seem to have had at least one indulgence: chocolate. Researchers report that half […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today