archaeological field training

Contact

Kate Sarther Gann
Communications Coordinator
(520) 882-6946, ext. 16

2017
05
Jul

Learning about Preservation in Archaeology

Taylor Picard, Humboldt State University (July 5, 2017)—Recognizing that archaeological resources are nonrenewable, today’s archaeologists try to preserve as much of the resource as possible, as circumstances allow. Some nondestructive techniques include ground-penetrating radar, remote-sensing...
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2017
19
Jun

Watching the Landscape Change

Dylan Fick, New College of Florida (June 19, 2017)—Scarcely before we had finished digging our initial trench it was time for me to head out with two other students and a staff member to survey possible new sites for preservation and perhaps later investigation. This let me see a lot more of the ...
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2016
13
Jul

The Durability of an Ancient Technology

Alyssa Kyper, Eastern New Mexico University (Posted on July 13, 2016)—Today was an excellent day on survey with Evan, Karen, and Jon. We spent the cool, crisp morning showing Karen an array of check dams and terraces on a bench above the Gila River we had surveyed earlier in the season, double-...
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2016
12
Jul

A Room Revealed

Stacy L. Ryan, Teaching Assistant, Preservation Archaeology Field School (July 12, 2016)—Field school provides an opportunity to spend weeks getting to the bottom of a feature, and interpretations of what we encounter along the way can shift during the process. We proceed with patience and the ...
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2016
03
Jul

Community Outreach in Archaeology

Peter Babala, Santa Rosa Junior College (July 3, 2016)—A huge part of what initially attracted me to the field of archaeology was the sense of connection I get when I learn little more about the places I have lived and where the roots of my ancestries lie. It is a gift to have been given the op...
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2016
30
Jun

The Importance of Floors: A Case Study of Feature 300

Jonathan Alperstein, Vassar College (June 29, 2016)—Whether you are working in a pit house or a pueblo room block, one of the most exciting parts of an excavation unit to work on is the floor fill. This year, while excavating the pueblo room we labeled Feature 300, we removed a grueling number ...
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2016
28
Jun

Understanding the Landscape They Lived in

Evan Giomi, Survey Director, University of Arizona (June 27, 2016)—Archaeological survey is the activity of locating, identifying, and recording archaeological sites to build a record that can be later used by archaeologists looking to put shovels in the ground or monitor any damage to the sites ...
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2016
27
Jun

Adobe Walls

Conner Awayda, SUNY–Buffalo (June 27, 2016)—Protecting from wind and rain, allowing cool temperatures in the summer, and heating in the winter, adobe makes up the walls of past homes. A mixture of sand and clay, adobe is made from earth and water. By mixing in water until the soil is the righ...
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2016
17
Jun

The Archaeology of Looting

Elissa McDavid, Hendrix College (June 16, 2016)—Before arriving at field school, I had imagined well-preserved sites disturbed by nothing more than a few animal burrows, adobe walls and floors that behaved nicely, and no looting. (Blame National Geographic glamour and the fact that no one reall...
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2016
14
Jun

Leave-No-Trace Archaeology

 Lexie Bennicas, University of Hawaii (June 14, 2016)—When my turn at archaeological survey came, Evan led us past rattlesnakes and through thick brush into the valley of the Gila to a hill on the outskirts of the floodplain. Within minutes of approaching the hill we found artifacts rangin...
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2016
08
Jun

Survey Says…

Adam Sezate, Graduate of United States Naval Academy (June 8, 2016)–Under our survey supervisor, Evan Giomi, my partners and I had the opportunity to help the Nature Conservancy survey their land along the Gila River. My team and I were in search of any clues of past human settlement in an ...
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2016
07
Jun

Kickoff of Our 2016 Field School Blog Series

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (June 7, 2016)—The 2016 field season brings several exciting changes for the Preservation Archaeology Field School. One of the biggest changes for us is a new excavation site. We finished our fieldwork at the Cliff phase (A.D. 1300–1450+) D...
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