Pecos Pueblo, a Place of Persistence (ASW 33-3)

Pecos Pueblo, a Place of Persistence

Issue editor: Jeremy M. Moss

48 pages

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In this issue:

Pecos Pueblo, a Place of Persistence, Jeremy M. Moss
P`ǽkilâ, Chris Toya
The Upper Pecos Valley: A Good Place to Live, Genevieve N. Head
Pecos Beginnings: The Developmental Period, Jeremy M. Moss
Alfred V. Kidder’s Excavations at Pecos, Jeremy M. Moss
Plains–Pueblo Relations before the Coming of Europeans, Katherine A. Spielmann
Tobacco and Trade: Smoking Pipes from Pecos Pueblo, Kaitlyn E. Davis
The Pueblo Revolt at Pecos Pueblo, Jeremy M. Moss
Comanche Impacts on Pecos Pueblo and Mission, Jeremy M. Moss
Anna O. Shepard’s “Bombshell,” Judith A. Habicht-Mauche
Pottery Trends at Pecos Pueblo, C. Dean Wilson
“Living Archaeology” and the Glaze Ware Pottery of Pecos Pueblo, Eric Blinman
Remote Sensing Archaeological Surveys within Pecos National Historical Park, Charles M. Haecker
Pecos Petroglyphs: Documentation as Preservation, Jake DeGayner, Iraida Rodriguez, and Jeremy M. Moss
Spanish Colonial Construction at Pecos, James E. Ivey
Preserving Pecos Adobe of the 1600s and 1700s, Katherine Scott
Of Wheat Fields and Wheels: Hispano Settlement of the Upper Pecos River Valley in the 1800s, Stephen S. Post
Back Sight, William H. Doelle

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 33, No. 3

Issue editor: Jeremy M. Moss

“Pecos Pueblo has never been forgotten. As the early rays of the morning sun reach the house tops at Jemez Pueblo, the people greet the sun with corn meal in hand, calling upon the spirits of our Pecos Ancestors that reside at Pecos Pueblo.” — Chris Toya

Pecos Pueblo, a Place of Persistence, Jeremy M. Moss

Pecos National Historical Park

P`ǽkilâ, Chris Toya

Pueblo of Jemez

The Upper Pecos Valley: A Good Place to Live, Genevieve N. Head

Head, Genevieve N., and Janet D. Orcutt, editors
2002  From Folsom to Fogelson: The Cultural Resources Inventory Survey of Pecos National Historical Park. Intermountain Cultural Resources Management Professional Paper No. 66, National Park Service.

Pecos Beginnings: The Developmental Period, Jeremy M. Moss

Alfred V. Kidder’s Excavations at Pecos, Jeremy M. Moss

Plains–Pueblo Relations before the Coming of Europeans, Katherine A. Spielmann

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 25, No. 2, “The Salinas Province: Archaeology at the Edge of the World” (opens as a PDF)

Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument

Alibates Flint Quarries National Monument

Tobacco and Trade: Smoking Pipes from Pecos Pueblo, Kaitlyn E. Davis

Davis, Kaitlyn E.
2017  “The Ambassador’s Herb”: Tobacco Pipes as Evidence for Plains-Pueblo Interaction, Interethnic Negotiation, and Ceremonial Exchange in the Northern Rio Grande. Unpublished master’s thesis, Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder.

2019  “The Ambassador’s Herb”: Tobacco Pipes as Evidence for Village Specialization and Interethnic Exchange in the Northern Rio Grande. In Reframing the Northern Rio Grande Pueblo Economy, edited by Scott G. Ortman, pp. 144-154. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.

(In press)  Social Mechanisms of Plains-Pueblo Economics: Analysis of Smoking Pipes at Pecos Pueblo. In Pushing Boundaries: Proceedings of the 2018 Southwest Symposium, edited by Stephen Nash and Erin Baxter. University Press of Colorado, Boulder.

The Pueblo Revolt at Pecos Pueblo, Jeremy M. Moss

Kessell, John L.
1978  Kiva, Cross, and Crown. National Park Service.

(The volume can be read online here.)

Comanche Impacts on Pecos Pueblo and Mission, Jeremy M. Moss

Correction: The first sentence of this article should read, “Across several centuries of social and economic ties between Pecos Pueblo and its Plains neighbors, their fates became intertwined.”

Anna O. Shepard’s “Bombshell,” Judith A. Habicht-Mauche

Bishop, Ronald L. and Fredrick W. Lange (eds.)
1991  The Ceramic Legacy of Anna O. Shepard. University Press of Colorado, Niwot.

Habicht-Mauche, Judith A.
2002  Torturing Sherds: Ceramic Petrography and the Development of Rio Grande Archaeology, in Traditions, Transitions, and Technologies: Themes in Southwestern Archaeology, edited by Sarah H. Schlanger, pp. 49–58. University Press of Colorado, Niwot.

Kidder, Alfred Vincent and Anna O. Shepard
1936  The Pottery of Pecos, Volume II. Yale University Press, New Haven.

Morris, Elizabeth Ann
1974  Anna O. Shepard, 1903–1973. American Antiquity, 39(3): 448–451.

Shepard, Anna O.
1964  “Technological Sherd-Splitting” or an Unanswered Challenge. American Antiquity, 29(4): 518–520.

1965  Rio Grande Glaze-Paint Pottery: A Test of Petrographic Analyses, in Ceramics and Man, edited by Fredrick R. Matson, pp. 62–87. Viking Fund Publications in Anthropology No. 42. Wenner-Gren Foundation, New York.

Pottery Trends at Pecos Pueblo, C. Dean Wilson

Kidder, Alfred V
1958  Pecos, New Mexico. Archaeological Notes. Papers of the Robert S. Peabody Foundation of Archaeology, No. 5. Andover, Massachusetts.

Kidder, Alfred V., and Charles A. Amsden
1931  The Pottery of Pecos, Volume I, The Dull-Paint Wares. Papers of the Southwestern Expedition, no. 5, Yale University Press, New Haven.

Kidder, Alfred V., and Anna O. Shepard
1936  The Pottery of Pecos, Vol 2: The Glaze Paint, Culinary, and Other Wares. Papers of the Phillips Academy, South West Expedition no. 7. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Mera, Harry P
1932  Wares Ancestral to Tewa Polychrome. Laboratory of Anthropology Technical Series, Bulletin no. 4. Santa Fe.

1933  A Proposed Revision of the Rio Grande Glaze Paint Sequence. Laboratory of Anthropology Technical Series No. 5. Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe.

1934  A Survey of the Biscuit Ware Area in Northern New Mexico. Laboratory of Anthropology Technical Series Bulletin No.8. Santa Fe.

1935  Ceramic Clues to the Prehistory of North Central New Mexico. Technical Series Bulletin No. 8, Laboratory of Anthropology, Santa Fe.

1939  Style Trends of Pueblo Pottery in the Rio Grande and Little Colorado Cultural Areas from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Century. Laboratory of Anthropology Memoirs 3, Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe.

Powell, Melissa S
2002 Ceramics. In From Folsom to Fogelson: The Cultural Resources Inventory Survey of Pecos National Historic Park, Vol. I, edited by G. N. Head and J. D. Orcutt, pp. 237–304. Intermountain Cultural Resource Management Professional Paper No. 66. Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Schleher, Kari L.
2010 Ceramic Production at San Marcos Pueblo New Mexico. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico.

Shepard, Anna O.
1942 Rio Grande Glaze Paint Ware: A Study Illustrating the Place of Ceramic Technological Analysis in Archaeological Research. Contributions to American Anthropology and History No. 39. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication No. 528. Washington D.C.

“Living Archaeology” and the Glaze Ware Pottery of Pecos Pueblo, Eric Blinman

Evelyn M. Vigil, Phan-un-pha-kee (Young Doe), and Juanita T. Toldeo, Pha-wa-luh-luh (Ring-Cloud around the Moon), entry at nmhistoricwomen.org

Remote Sensing Archaeological Surveys within Pecos National Historical Park, Charles M. Haecker

Pecos Petroglyphs: Documentation as Preservation, Jake DeGayner, Iraida Rodriguez, and Jeremy M. Moss

Spanish Colonial Construction at Pecos, James E. Ivey

Preserving Pecos Adobe of the 1600s and 1700s, Katherine Scott

Of Wheat Fields and Wheels: Hispano Settlement of the Upper Pecos River Valley in the 1800s, Stephen S. Post

Back Sight, William H. Doelle