Introducing the Fremont (ASW 29-4)

Issue editor: James R. Allison

“Fremont” is a label archaeologists use for the northern contemporaries of Ancestral Pueblo people. Fremont peoples lived mostly in what is now the state of Utah, in the eastern Great Basin and on the northern Colorado Plateau. Their range extended slightly beyond the modern borders of Utah. Fremont peoples across this region shared styles of pottery, architecture, rock art, figurines, and moccasins. Despite broad similarities across the region, Fremont peoples were not a homogeneous cultural group. In this issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine, authors briefly review what is known about the Fremont and share recent research on Fremont lifeways.

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In this issue:

Introducing the Fremont — James R. Allison

Coming Together: Fremont Communal Structures — Lindsay D. Johansson

Shared Style: Design and Fremont Painted Pottery — Katie K. Richards

Gazing Back at You: Fremont Figurines — David T. Yoder

Maize on the Margins: Fremont Foodways and Menus — Tim Riley

Photo Essay: Fremont Rock Art — Troy Scotter

Patterns and Variability: The Fremont Regional System — Richard K. Talbot

Centers of Culture, Commerce, and Technology: Fremont Villages in the Parowan Valley — Scott M. Ure

Wolf Village: New Insights on the Fremont — James R. Allison

Maize Growing, Processing, and Storage: Evidence from Nine Mile Canyon — Jody J. Patterson

Preservation Spotlight: Paragonah Mounds — Chaz Evans

Back Sight — William H. Doelle

Archaeology Southwest Magazine, Vol. 29, No. 4

Issue editor: James R. Allison, Brigham Young University

“Fremont” is a label archaeologists use for the northern contemporaries of Ancestral Pueblo people. Fremont peoples lived mostly in what is now the state of Utah, in the eastern Great Basin and on the northern Colorado Plateau. Their range extended slightly beyond the modern borders of Utah. Fremont peoples across this region shared styles of pottery, architecture, rock art, figurines, and moccasins. Despite broad similarities across the region, Fremont peoples were not a homogeneous cultural group. In this issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine, authors briefly review what is known about the Fremont and share recent research on Fremont lifeways.

For further reading (opens as a PDF)

For further viewing:

Largest Fremont Structure Uncovered by BYU Archaeology Students in Goshen, Utah (Wolf Village): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EER_ensXk7M

BYU Archaeological Dig at the Hinckley Mounds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-ukS-Wq9oo

Archaeology Meets Technology: BYU Fremont Dig Uses New Tools: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTalyNxJE2Q

Preserving the ancient ruins of Utah’s Nine Mile Canyon (PBS News Hour): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lbo9-49XrAI

Range Creek Documentary by Blaine Lundy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=evqkZwXS7N4

Time Team America Range Creek: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QHEB2seOsis

Introducing the FremontJames R. Allison

For catalog numbers of the bone gaming pieces in the collections of the Natural History Museum of Utah pictured on page 4, click here (opens as a PDF).

Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Brigham Young University

University of Colorado Natural History Museum

Dinosaur National Monument

François Gohier Photography

Neil M. Judd’s excavations at Paragonah

Coming Together: Fremont Communal StructuresLindsay D. Johansson

The artist’s reconstruction of the central structure at Five Finger Ridge (page 7) is adapted from an illustration on page 41 of

Janetski, Joel C.

1998 Archaeology of Clear Creek Canyon. Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Brigham Young University.

Shared Style: Design and Fremont Painted PotteryKatie K. Richards

Richards, Katie Kristina, “Fremont Ceramic Designs and Their Implications” (2014). All Theses and Dissertations. Paper 4203. (Opens as a PDF.)

Fremont Indian State Park and Museum

Hutchings Museum of Natural and Cultural History

Gazing Back at You: Fremont FigurinesDavid T. Yoder

For institutions, site numbers, and catalog numbers of the figurines pictured on the cover of this issue and on pages 10–11, click here (opens as a PDF).

Fremont Indian State Park and Museum

Museum of Peoples and Cultures, Brigham Young University

Natural History Museum of Utah

Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum

Maize on the Margins: Fremont Foodways and MenusTim Riley

Utah State University Eastern Prehistoric Museum

Primer on isotope analysis (Time Team America, PBS)

Dr. Riley adds: “Carbon stable isotopes vary in plants due to different photosynthetic pathways. These forms occur in different frequencies in plants based on photosynthesis. Maize, a tropical grass, has a very different chemical pathway than most temperate plants.”

Photo Essay: Fremont Rock ArtTroy Scotter

Online exclusive: Troy Scotter’s guide to Utah’s publicly accessible rock art sites (opens as a PDF)

Capitol Reef National Park

Dinosaur National Monument

Range Creek Canyon (Natural History Museum of Utah)

Calf Creek Pictograph
Pictograph, Calf Creek. Photo by Troy Scotter.

Patterns and Variability: The Fremont Regional SystemRichard K. Talbot

Centers of Culture, Commerce, and Technology: Fremont Villages in the Parowan ValleyScott M. Ure

Neil M. Judd’s excavations at Paragonah

Fowler Museum at UCLA

Southern Utah University, Department of History, Sociology, & Anthropology

University of Utah, Department of Anthropology

Wolf Village: New Insights on the FremontJames R. Allison

Largest Fremont Structure Uncovered by BYU Archaeology Students in Goshen, Utah (Wolf Village): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EER_ensXk7M

Maize Growing, Processing, and Storage: Evidence from Nine Mile CanyonJody J. Patterson

Nine Mile Canyon (BLM)

Preservation Spotlight: Paragonah MoundsChaz Evans

The Archaeological Conservancy

Carhart Pueblo (link goes to an article on The Archaeological Conservancy’s Facebook page with additional images)

Paragonah Mounds and here (link goes to an article on The Archaeological Conservancy’s Facebook page with additional images)

Southern Utah University, Department of History, Sociology, & Anthropology

Frontier Homestead State Park and Museum

Back SightWilliam H. Doelle

Simms, Steven R., and François Gohier

2010 Traces of Fremont. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City.

E. P. and Dorothy Hickman Pectol Family Organization (link goes to web pages about the Hickman/Pectol Family and its museum and collections)

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