Dogs in the Southwest (ASW 22-3)

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Volume 22-3 (Summer 2008)

This special theme issue explores some of the roles that dogs have played in the Southwest, from prehistory to the present.

Contributors discuss archaeological evidence of dogs; the changing roles and uses of dogs among various groups; their place in traditional stories; material culture made from dog bones and dog hair; depictions of dogs in Ancestral Pueblo, Mimbres, and Hohokam material culture as well as Southwestern and Yoeme art; their use as weapons against Native Americans by the Spaniards; and the ways in which dogs contribute to our sense of place.

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This issues articles include:
• Dogs in the Southwest – Tobi Taylor, Center for Desert Archaeology; Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum; Dody Fugate, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
• Early Dog Burials in the Southern Southwest – Jennifer A. Waters, Desert Archaeology, Inc.
• Pueblo Dogs – Dody Fugate, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture
• Pueblo Dog Tales – David H. Snow, Cross-Cultural Research Systems
• Basketmaker Dog-hair Sashes from Obelisk Cave – Rachel Freer and Mike Jacobs, Arizona State Museum
• A Rare Breed – Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum
• Canid Sacrifices from Homol’ovi I – Vincent M. LaMotta, University of Illinois at Chicago
• Itzcuintle: Ancient Mexican Dog Food – Marc Thompson, El Paso Museum of Archaeology
• When is a Dog in Mimbres Art? – J. J. Brody, University of New Mexico
• Mimbres Dog Descendents – Toby Taylor, Center for Desert Archaeology
• Hohokam Dogs and Iconography at Pueblo Grande – Steven R. James, California State University at Fullerton; Michael S. Foster, Logan Simpson Design
• Dogs in the Desert: Repatriation – Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum
• Going to the Dogs: Studying Valley Fever in the Southwest – T. Michael Fink
• An Unsettling Image – William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology
• The Setting on of Dogs – Richard Flint, Center for Desert Archaeology
• Yoeme Dog Pascola Masks – Tom Kolaz, Southwest Center
• Old Dogs and Some New Tricks – Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum
• Back Sight – William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

Dogs in the Southwest

This photograph, titled Benjamin and His Brood of Little Dogs, was taken by David Burckhalter in Rancho San Pedro, Sonora, Mexico, on a cold morning in 1995. It illustrates many of this issue's themes. The dogs (and one cat) are clearly social animals, and they are part of a human household. Their relationship with their human companion structures their interaction among themselves, as well as with human society.

This photograph, titled Benjamin and His Brood of Little Dogs, was taken by David Burckhalter in Rancho San Pedro, Sonora, Mexico, on a cold morning in 1995. It illustrates many of this issue’s themes. The dogs (and one cat) are clearly social animals, and they are part of a human household. Their relationship with their human companion structures their interaction among themselves, as well as with human society.

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 22, No. 3
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Issue editors: Tobi Taylor, Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology), Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum, and Dody Fugate, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

This special theme issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine explores some of the roles that dogs have played in the Southwest, from prehistory to the present.

Contributors discuss archaeological evidence of dogs; the changing roles and uses of dogs among various groups; their place in traditional stories; material culture made from dog bones and dog hair; depictions of dogs in Ancestral Pueblo, Mimbres, and Hohokam material culture as well as Southwestern and Yoeme art; their use as weapons against Native Americans by the Spaniards; and the ways in which dogs contribute to our sense of place.

Articles include:

Dogs in the Southwest — Tobi Taylor, Center for Desert Archaeology, Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum, and Dody Fugate, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Early Dog Burials in the Southern Southwest — Jennifer A. Waters, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Pueblo Dogs — Dody Fugate, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

Pueblo Dog Tales — David H. Snow, Cross-Cultural Research Systems

Basketmaker Dog Hair Sashes from Obelisk Cave — Rachel Freer and Mike Jacobs, Arizona State Museum

A Rare Breed — Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum

Canid Sacrifices from Homol’ovi I — Vincent M. LaMotta, University of Illinois at Chicago

Itzcuintle: Ancient Mexican Dog Food — Marc Thompson, El Paso Museum of Archaeology

When Is a Dog in Mimbres Art? — J.J. Brody, University of New Mexico

Mimbres Dog Descendants — Tobi Taylor, Center for Desert Archaeology

Hohokam Dogs and Iconography at Pueblo Grande — Steven R. James, California State University at Fullerton, and Michael S. Foster, Logan Simpson Design

Dogs in the Desert: Repatriation — Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum

Going to the Dogs: Studying Valley Fever in the Southwest — T. Michael Fink

An Unsettling Image — William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

The Setting on of Dogs — Richard Flint, Center for Desert Archaeology

Yoeme Dog Pascola Masks — Tom Kolaz, Southwest Center

Old Dogs and Some New Tricks — Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum

Back Sight — William H. Doelle, President & CEO, Center for Desert Archaeology

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