Arizona - Central

Contact

Kate Sarther
Communications Director
Email | (520) 882-6946, ext. 16

 

2017
01
Sep

cyberSW

Big Data for Big Questions Archaeology Southwest is pleased to announce that a new joint initiative, cyberSW, has received a $1.7 million award through the National Science Foundation’s RIDIR program (Resource Implementations for Data Intensive Research in the Social Behavioral and Economic Sci...
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2017
17
Aug

Caring for Ancient Places: Stabilizing Casa Malpais

Located at the edge of a shield volcano overlooking the modern town of Springerville, Arizona, the ancient village of Casa Malpais sits on a terrace made of a type of volcanic basalt called Malpais. People built the village over a number of volcanic fissures that provided easily accessible “baseme...
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2017
18
Jul

Fluid Identities

Land, Water, and Religion during the Gila River Millennium (A.D. 450–1450) In 2017, Archaeology Southwest is beginning a new five-year investigation, which builds on the methods and themes of our Salado Impact investigation, and expands the temporal and geographic focus substantially. Social...
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2017
18
May

Sinagua

Banner image by Tomas Castelazo, via Wikimedia Commons Populations in the Sinagua (sin-OW-wah) area lived in large pithouse and pueblo communities. They practiced flexible hunting, gathering, and farming strategies specific to some of the challenging landscapes they inhabited, including the San F...
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2017
18
May

Pataya

Pataya (pah-tah-yáh) is a word of the Pai branch (Hualapai, Havasupai, Yavapai, and Paipai) of the Yuman-Cochimí language family that translates loosely as “old people.” As used by archaeologists, Pataya refers to a specific material culture spread throughout western Arizona, southern Calif...
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2017
18
May

Hohokam

Banner image by Robert B. Ciaccio People who resided in the Hohokam (ho-ho-kahm) region were probably among the ancestors of contemporary southern desert populations, such as the O'odham, as well as Pueblo populations and perhaps other populations in northern Mexico. Early Hohokam settleme...
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2017
18
May

Mogollon

People who lived in the Mogollon (muggy-own) region in the distant past had much in common with people living in the Ancestral Pueblo region, and were probably also among the ancestors of modern Pueblo people and even other contemporary communities in the southern Southwest and Mexico. The ea...
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2017
06
Apr

Agua Fria National Monument

Banner image courtesy of the Bureau of Land Management, via Flickr From the website of Agua Fria National Monument: "The Agua Fria National Monument contains more than 400 archaeological sites, spanning some 2,000 years of human history. "Many of the national monument’s archaeological sit...
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2016
01
Jun

Hands-On Archaeology

Archaeology Southwest’s new Hands-On Archaeology program connects people of today with daily life in the distant past.
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2016
01
Jun

Coordinated Resource Management Planning for Arizona's Perry Mesa

Archaeology Southwest joins the Bureau of Land Management, United States Forest Service, Arizona Game and Fish Department, and other stakeholders in identifying long-term needs and management goals for Arizona’s Perry Mesa. In 2011, Arizona’s Game and Fish Department (AZGFD) purchased Hor...
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2016
01
Jun

Travel Management on Our National Forests

If you’ve ever visited one of our National Forests, part of your experience within its boundaries involved travel on a road open to motorized vehicles. Over the past 30 years, as the popularity and availability of four-wheel-drive and off-highway vehicles has increased, motorized uses of our publi...
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2016
01
Jun

Protecting Places on the Land

Long-term protection of archaeological sites is an essential component of Preservation Archaeology. Here in the American Southwest, a great number of important archaeological sites occur on private land. Nineteenth-century homesteaders settled in areas with readily available water and arable land...
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