Author Archive

Fire Adds Richness to the Land

Sunday, March 26th, 2017

Fire Adds Richness to the Land The Jemez Mountains are “the poster child” of wildfire problems in the Southwestern U.S. Residents recall too well the evacuations of Los Alamos during the 2000 Cerro Grande and 2011 Las Conchas Fires. They also recall the enormous plumes of smoke rising over our mountains, the loss of hundreds […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Bears Ears Report

Sunday, March 19th, 2017

Tribal Commission on Bears Ears Declares Revocation of Monument Status Would Be Tragic Members of a newly formed tribal advisory commission for the Bears Ears National Monument reminded Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke in a letter Friday that his agency must partner with them, and warned him that rescinding or shrinking the monument would be “absolute […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Editorial: Interior Secretary Zinke’s Visit to Utah Likely a Defining Moment

Sunday, March 5th, 2017

Grand Canyon Trust Profiles Forest Service Archaeologist Connie Reid The words culture, conservation, and commitment all begin with the letter C. And so does the name of Connie Reid, the archaeologist for the North Kaibab Ranger District on the Kaibab National Forest. The Trust has been working with her for the last decade to survey […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

600 Boulders?

Rock Art Model
Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

Doug Gann, Preservation Archaeologist and Digital Media Specialist (February 28, 2017)—”Don’t bite off more than you can chew,” the old saying goes. In this case, to paraphrase another idiom, my eyes were definitely bigger than my computer’s hard drive. Photoscan of Painted Rocks, Gila Bend, AZ The image above is a fully interactive 3D model. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Identification of a Powerful Matrilineal Descent Line at Pueblo Bonito

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Identification of a Powerful Matrilineal Descent Line at Pueblo Bonito They believe that power and influence in Chaco Canyon was hierarchical, belonged to this small group of people and was passed down through a female line between 800 and 1130 A.D. “At the center of Chaco is an elite matriline,” said Douglas J. Kennett, an […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

“Kennewick Man” Repatriated

Sunday, February 19th, 2017

“Kennewick Man” Repatriated Less than 24 hours after they were inventoried in Seattle, the remains of the Ancient One — also known as Kennewick Man — were laid to rest at a private ceremony at an undisclosed location Saturday, according Colville tribal chairman Michael Marchand.  The repatriation of the bones, which were found near the Columbia […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Archaeology Southwest’s Paul Reed on Protecting Chaco Canyon

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

Editorial: Archaeology Southwest’s Paul Reed on Protecting Chaco Canyon Our public lands were at the center of many celebrations this past year. The centennial of the National Park Service allowed Americans across the country to celebrate what makes America so special: our public lands, cultural sites and natural wonders. This year, New Mexicans also were […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Utah Legislature Protests Bears Ears Designation

Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Utah Legislature Protests Bears Ears Designation Star-filled nights and natural quiet, deafening silence. Pinyon-juniper woodlands, blackbrush, rabbitbrush, bitterbrush. Mule deer, coyote, porcupine, skunk. Diversity of soils, aka dirt. These are some of the many natural features highlighted in former President Barack Obama’s recent proclamation designating Bears Ears National Monument, setting aside 1.3 million ares of public […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Oil Drilling Closes in on Chaco Canyon

Sunday, January 29th, 2017

Oil Drilling Closes in on Chaco Canyon On January 25, the Bureau of Land Management leased nearly 850 acres of land for drilling in northwest New Mexico, netting close to $3 million. The agency offers leases on millions of acres of public land per year, but this latest sale was unusual. Not only was it […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

A Tohono O’odham View of the Legacy in the Landscape

Monday, January 23rd, 2017

Editorial: A Tohono O’odham View of the Legacy in the Landscape ‘Legacy” is a word we’re hearing a lot lately. Words and ideas are but one kind of legacy, though. For me and other American Indians, our legacy is through the land. Our history is in the land. So much of the nation’s rich history […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Monument Wars

Sunday, January 15th, 2017

The Monument Wars In the West, where I currently live, we have our own unfinished wars: the Indian wars. I was reminded of how unfinished they are this fall, when I attended a demonstration led by Native Americans against the Dakota Access Pipeline. The protest took place in front of the statehouse in Bismarck, North […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Is Revocation of National Monuments Even Possible?

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

Is Revocation of National Monuments Even Possible? Utah’s congressional delegation, Gov. Gary Herbert, and Utah lawmakers have all-but-declared war on the new monument designation. Many have also voiced a desire to have Trump reverse the order once he takes office. That’s something no president has ever done. John Ruple, another professor at University of Utah said […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Bears Ears, Gold Butte Designated National Monuments

Sunday, January 1st, 2017

Bears Ears, Gold Butte Designated National Monuments Rising from the center of the southeastern Utah landscape and visible from every direction are twin buttes so distinctive that in each of the native languages of the region their name is the same: Hoon’Naqvut, Shash Jáa, Kwiyagatu Nukavachi, Ansh AnLashokdiwe, or “Bears Ears.” For hundreds of generations, […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Archaeology Southwest Acquires Another Important Place of the Past: Baicatcan

Sunday, December 25th, 2016

Archaeology Southwest Acquires Another Important Place of the Past: Baicatcan In 2011, Daniel Baker donated a conservation easement to Archaeology Southwest over 8 acres of his 12-acre residence to protect a portion of the José Solas Ruin. In 2014, Daniel approached Archaeology Southwest about donating his 1/3 undivided interest in the Taylor site. In addition to Daniel’s […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Vandalism at South Mountain: Disappointing Discoveries in Phoenix

Sunday, December 18th, 2016

Vandalism at South Mountain: Disappointing Discoveries in Phoenix A few weeks ago, I decided to revisit a couple of the petroglyph panels we recorded a decade ago. I was hoping to get some new, higher-resolution photographs, and I was really anxious to see one of the more impressive and interesting panels, which bears over 70 […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Salt Lake Tribune Takes a Stand for the Antiquities Act

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

Salt Lake Tribune Takes a Stand for the Antiquities Act and Our National Monuments Rob Bishop has made it clear that he would like for the Antiquities Act of 1906 to just go away. And for all those who support the law to “die.” Until one or both of those happen, though, neither the incoming president […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Native America Victorious at Standing Rock

Sunday, December 4th, 2016

Native America Victorious at Standing Rock The Army Corps of Engineers will not grant the permit for the Dakota Access pipeline to drill under the Missouri river, the army announced on Sunday, handing a major victory to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe after a months-long campaign against the pipeline. Assistant secretary for civil works Jo-Ellen Darcy […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

New Data on the Domestication of Maize

Sunday, November 27th, 2016

New Data on the Domestication of Maize According to an international team of scientists who have sequenced the genome of a 5,310-year-old maize cob from the Tehuacan Valley, the maize (Zea mays) grown in central Mexico more than five millennia ago was genetically more similar to modern maize than to its wild counterpart. Scientists have long […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Protests at Standing Rock: A Model for How We Might Protect the Chaco Landscape?

Monday, November 21st, 2016

Protests at Standing Rock: A Model for How We Might Protect the Chaco Landscape? Protesters in North Dakota have made headlines for months with their prolonged opposition to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The thousands of protesters include representatives from Native American tribes along with environmental activists who have joined the Standing Rock protest […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Can National Monuments Be Dissolved?

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

Can National Monuments Be Dissolved? As his presidential tenure winds down in the coming weeks, Barack Obama is expected to decide whether to designate some proposed national monuments, including Bears Ears in Utah and two others on Utah’s borders with neighboring states. But Donald Trump’s surprise victory in the race to succeed Obama likely changes the […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

What You Need to Know about the Dakota Access Pipeline Conflict

Sunday, November 6th, 2016

What You Need to Know about the Dakota Access Pipeline Conflict In recent weeks, protests against the building of the Dakota Access Pipeline across North Dakota have escalated. Native American elders, families and children have set up tepees and tents on a campsite near the pipeline’s path in the hope of stopping its construction. Dave Archambault Jr., […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Temporary Halt to Fracking near Chaco Canyon Overturned

Sunday, October 30th, 2016

Temporary Halt to Fracking near Chaco Canyon Overturned An effort to temporarily halt drilling across part of one of the nation’s largest natural gas fields has been rejected by a federal appeals court, leaving environmentalists to push their case against hydraulic fracturing in district court. A coalition of environmental groups sued the Bureau of Land Management […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Federal Government Announces New Review of Fracking near Chaco Canyon

Sunday, October 23rd, 2016

Federal Government Announces New Review of Fracking near Chaco Canyon The federal government announced Thursday that it will study the potential effects of drilling on public and tribal lands near Chaco Culture National Historical Park in the San Juan Basin, an area that is one of the state’s largest centers for oil and gas production. Environmental […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

High Country News Recaps the Conflict at Bears Ears

Sunday, October 16th, 2016

High Country News Recaps the Conflict at Bears Ears The proposed monument does not include any tribal lands, yet if anyone is home here, it’s Begaye, whose ancestors sought refuge near the Bears Ears during the 1860s, when U.S. troops killed, brutalized and enslaved Navajos before exiling them from their homeland. The Zuni, Hopi and […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

The Blog Must Go On

Doug's still blogging.
Sunday, October 9th, 2016

As International Archaeology Day (October 15, 2016) approaches, we’re celebrating by sharing posts about what we’re working on now—the daily work of archaeology. Doug Gann, Preservation Archaeologist and Digital Media Specialist (October 9, 2016)—For the last 13 years, I have had the pleasure of editing the weekly Southwest Archaeology Today (SAT) newsletter. It has become one of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog