Archive for September, 2016

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Find Good Tool Stone

Flakeable Rock
Wednesday, September 28th, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (September 28, 2016)—I often have people ask me how to find good stone to flintknap. It’s not easy. I enjoy working rock I have gathered myself from places I have visited or from areas near sites where I have worked. Looking at artifacts people made in the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Bears Ears and the Issue of Ownership

El Malpais Homestead
Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

This post was originally published on September 23, 2016, on the Binghamton University MAPA blog, http://mapabing.org/2016/09/23/bears-ears-and-the-issue-with-ownership/. Re-posted courtesy of the author and with the original blog’s permissions. Kellam Throgmorton, PhD Candidate, SUNY Binghamton University (September 23, 2016)—Howdy! This week I return to our “regularly scheduled programming” and discuss the issue of ownership in relation to archaeology and public […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Utah Public Lands Initiative Clears House Committee

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Utah Public Lands Initiative Clears House Committee The House Natural Resources Committee advanced the Public Lands Initiative on Thursday, moving the bill to the full House with a week to go before Congress adjourns until after the election. The PLI, sponsored by Utah Reps. Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz, would protect part of the Bears Ears […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Heat-Treat Rock

Charcoal Burning
Friday, September 23rd, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (September 23, 2016)—In this post, I show the process I use to heat-treat rocks. I learned this technique years ago and have been using it ever since. Why heat-treat rock? In short, because it makes tough or grainy rock easier to flake. The best rock for flintknapping […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology Café Returns

Archaeology Cafe -- Featured
Thursday, September 22nd, 2016

Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator (September 22, 2016)—Autumn has always been my favorite season. Transplanted to Tucson from Chicago 25 years ago, I’ve come to appreciate the more subtle signs of the season here—raking light, denser traffic, Halloween costume ideas that don’t incorporate a coat… And, for the past eight years, autumn also means Archaeology […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Don’t Blame the Salt at Chaco?

Sunday, September 18th, 2016

Research Finds Salt Infiltration Was Not a Problem at Chaco Canyon Various salt compounds found deep in the soil of New Mexico’s desert may be the key to understanding how crops were cultivated in ancient Chaco Canyon – despite the backdrop of what seems an otherwise arid and desolate landscape, according to a University of Cincinnati […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Piecing History Back Together: A Lesson from the Past about the Future of the Bears Ears

Ground Stone Tool
Monday, September 12th, 2016

Ben Bellorado, Archaeologist (September 13, 2016)—Cultural affiliation studies are particularly important tools that Native peoples, anthropologists, and archaeologists use to demonstrate tangible links between people of the ancient past and contemporary societies. These studies are especially significant in the politically charged events presently surrounding the push to designate a national monument around the Bears Ears […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Florence Lister Passes

Sunday, September 11th, 2016

Florence Lister Passes Florence Lister, a prominent archaeologist in the American Southwest, died Sunday at her home in Mancos. She was 96. “She succeeded in a field that was dominated by men, and she found her own niche, and she lived long enough to write major books that helped the public understand archaeology in the Southwest,” […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Haft a Point into a Foreshaft

Sinew After Drying
Wednesday, September 7th, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (September 7, 2016)—Hunters probably used foreshafts for multiple purposes, including as knives. In this example I will show how to use real sinew with pitch to haft a point. This makes a very strong haft. Putting a little bit of pitch over the sinew makes it waterproof […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

U.S. Rep. Grijalva and Tribal Members Unite to Protect Great Bend of the Gila

Monday, September 5th, 2016

U.S. Rep. Grijalva and Tribal Members Unite to Protect Great Bend of the Gila In light of a study recently released by Archaeology Southwest which connects various tribes including those in Yuma to the Great Bend of the Gila, Congressman Raul Grijalva joined together with tribal representatives and other groups to renew the call to establish […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Haft a Stone Knife, Dart Point, or Arrow Point

Hafting Knives
Friday, September 2nd, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (September 2, 2016)—During the field school for the past two years we have used hafted stone knives to carve the hooks in our atlatls. These knives also work incredibly well for a variety of tasks, from carving wood to cutting willows. They can be used like a […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Hands-On Archaeology: How to Make Pitch Sticks

Pitch Sticks
Thursday, September 1st, 2016

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert (September 1, 2016)—All projectile points are but one component of a hunter’s equipment—each point would have been hafted to a foreshaft or handle. There are several materials that may be used to accomplish this task. In this post, I will show how I make a pine-pitch resin […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog