Archive for June, 2014

A Lesson Quickly Learned

Chert Projectile Point
Monday, June 30th, 2014

Maxwell Forton, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student A lesson quickly learned: not every excavation is going to unearth the find of the century. All too often, a unit is going to fail to meet your hopes and expectations. My group’s excavations atop the hill overlooking the Dinwiddie site failed to yield the preserved architecture that […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology Southwest Acquires a Portion of Quail Point Rock Art Complex

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

Archaeology Southwest Acquires a Portion of Quail Point Rock Art Complex Protection of millennia-old rock art in the Gila Bend region of Arizona was strengthened in June 2014 when Archaeology Southwest acquired a 360-acre parcel that includes a large portion of Quail Point, an impressive rock art site within the proposed Great Bend of the Gila National […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Seeing is Believing: The Importance of Field Trips

Paul Reed Leading Chaco Tour
Saturday, June 28th, 2014

Danielle Gilbert, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student Preservation, excavation, and education are just a few of the goals of the Preservation Archaeology Field School, and after only three weeks in the field, I feel that I have a new appreciation and understanding of these concepts. I have seen and learned many things through working at […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Field School Proverbs

Mule Creek
Friday, June 27th, 2014

Selena Soto, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student Hi all! This is my third week here at the Preservation Archaeology Field School in New Mexico, and it has been an exhilarating experience so far! I have never been on an archaeological dig before, so I have been soaking in all of the knowledge and all of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology in the Southwestern and Eastern United States

Excavations at the Dinwiddie Site
Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Alex Covert, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student I participated in a field school in Virginia last summer, and that experience was quite different from the one I’m having in New Mexico this summer. Through these two experiences, I have realized that archaeology varies greatly depending on where one is working. In Virginia, the program took […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

A Dilemma Solved

Field School Aerial
Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

Madisen Dancer, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student When I was accepted into the Archaeology Southwest/University of Arizona field school this past March, I was delighted. I was also ready to tackle a problem I had been considering since deciding to change my major to geography: how might archaeology and geography complement each other? Before coming […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Archaeology and You

Experimental Archaeology Lessons
Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

Kaelyn Olson, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student One of the strangest things about my first time in the Southwest is being surrounded by experienced graduate students and archaeological professionals. Initially, I felt as if I was completely out of my league. They spoke in code, using terms like, “sherds,” “lithics,” and “screens,” and the only […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

National Park Service Bans “Drones”

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

National Park Service Bans “Drones” The National Park Service announced today that they are banning the use of drones and model aircraft in all National Parks, subject to a few limited exceptions. According to a policy memorandum released by Jonathan Jarvis, Director of the Park Service, the directive is an interim measure while the park […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Even the Smallest Piece

Perforated Plate Sherd
Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Will Russell, Field Supervisor     One of the highlights of teaching is the look of discovery and excitement on a student’s face. Recently, I was wiping sweat from my eyes and filling out paperwork amidst a cloud of dust shaken from the screens when I heard Andrew say, “Hey, Will, take a look at this!” […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Boom Times for Archaeologists in North Dakota – Is the Four Corners Region Next?

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

Boom Times for Archaeologists in North Dakota – Is the Four Corners Region Next? Drilling crews are eager to plunge their equipment into the ground. Road builders are ready to start highway projects, and construction workers need to dig. But across the hyperactive oil fields of North Dakota, these and other groups often must wait for […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Rusty American Dream

Religious Statue in a Basin
Friday, June 13th, 2014

By Lewis Borck, Preservation Archaeology Fellow   Ahhhhhhh, the scent of green chiles, sage, piñon, dust, ponderosa…and a vehicle full of sweaty, tired folk who have lost all sense of societal norms. It must be field school season again. This year, my job is to lead the survey portion of the Preservation Archaeology Field School. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Slow and Steady, the Ancient Way

Digging the Foundation Trenches
Thursday, June 12th, 2014

Riley Duke, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student Hello, Archaeology Southwest blog readers! So far, my time at the Preservation Archaeology Field School has been nothing less than fantastic. I have spent the majority of my time either in the field excavating or with staff members working in experimental archaeology. My excavation group and I are […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

From the Book to the Field

Shell Bracelet Fragment
Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Hannah Zanotto, Preservation Archaeology Field School Student After a week in the field, I am finally gaining the experience I have been searching for since my first archaeology lecture on my first day of college. Three weeks ago, I graduated from Arizona State University with a B.A. in Anthropology. As an undergraduate, I spent countless […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Celebrating World Atlatl Day

Atlatl Team
Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Allen Denoyer and Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologists The end of our students’ first full week in camp coincided with World Atlatl Day (June 7). This summer, field school students are rotating through experiences in experimental archaeology, as well as the more traditional excavation and survey course components. They have been working hard making their own […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Prelude to Fieldwork

Arizona State Museum Pottery Display
Monday, June 9th, 2014

Leslie Aragon, Field Supervisor Last week, we kicked off the 2014 Preservation Archaeology Field School. Students arrived in Tucson from all over the country, from Hawaii to Massachusetts, and spent a few days learning about Preservation Archaeology and Salado culture. At the Himdag Ki museum in Topawa, Arizona, students met members of the Tohono O’odham […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Arizona Historic Preservation Conference Begins Wednesday

Sunday, June 8th, 2014

Arizona Historic Preservation Conference Begins Wednesday The 2014 Arizona Historic Preservation Conference will be held June 11-13 at the Esplendor Resort in Rio Rico near Nogales. Nogales Mayor Arturo Garino said. “This year’s theme of ‘Economic Engines of Preservation’ on how preservation efforts can positively affect the local economy could not come at a better […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Teaching and Research at the 2014 Preservation Archaeology Field School

Danielle and Kaelyn
Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

Karen Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist   Our 2014 Preservation Archaeology Field School in the Upper Gila area has just begun, and we are off to a great start. Over the coming weeks, our students and staff will be writing blog posts summarizing some of our research and their learning experiences here in Mule Creek, New Mexico. […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Bruce Babbit Advocates for a Major Push in Public Lands Protection

Sunday, June 1st, 2014

Bruce Babbit Advocates for a Major Push in Public Lands Protection When a racist rancher in Nevada and his armed supporters can command headlines by claiming to own and control publicly owned lands, perhaps it’s time to remind Westerners about the history of the nation’s public-land heritage. Recall that it is we, the American people, who […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today