What We Do: Information

In the Mountain Shadows

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 27, No. 1

Issue editors: William H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest, and Deborah L. Swartz, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Honeybee Reconstruction by Rob Ciaccio

Cover image: Artist’s visualization of a moment in time at Honey Bee Village, a Hohokam settlement about 4 miles northwest of Romero Ruin and generally contemporaneous with its peak of settlement between about A.D 850 and 1000. Daily life would have looked much the same at Romero Ruin, with ramadas and clusters of pithouses. Recent fieldwork at Honey Bee and nearby sites helps us understand Romero Ruin in the context of a larger community of Hohokam settlements in the Cañada del Oro valley. Image: Robert B. Ciaccio. Cover design: Kathleen Bader.

In 1996, we published Archaeology in the Mountain Shadows: Exploring the Romero Ruin, a booklet that shared information about the archaeology of the park in terms of what we knew then about the northern Tucson Basin in the distant past. Our understanding of what life was like for the people who lived in the Tucson Basin between A.D. 500 and 1450 has expanded since then. Archaeologists call these people the Hohokam, and the Romero Ruin tells part of their story, while also reflecting a bigger picture of Hohokam life. The thirtieth anniversary of Catalina State Park in 2013 provides a timely opportunity to revise Archaeology in the Mountain Shadows.

To visit the website of Catalina State Park, click here. To learn how you can support Catalina State Park, click here.Romero Petroglyph

In the Mountain Shadows: The Continuing Story of an Ancient Southern Arizona Community — William H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest, and Deborah L. Swartz, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

View the cover of the original booklet, Archaeology in the Mountain Shadows, here. It is now out of print.

The official website of Catalina State Park

The website of the Friends of Catalina State Park

romero_fieldwork_gallery

 What Is All around Me? Ecology and Archaeology of Catalina State Park

Learn more about cholla bud harvesting here. Find a recipe here. Learn more about saguaro fruit harvesting here and here.

To see images of and information about the plant and animal species of the Sonoran Desert, visit the digital library of the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

Learn more about bighorn sheep restoration projects at the website of the Arizona Desert Bighorn Sheep Society.

The official website of the Coronado National Forest

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE: Digital copy of archaeologist Emil W. Haury‘s original, handwritten site card for the Romero Ruin, posted with the permission of the Arizona State Museum Archaeological Records Office.

Haury completed the card in the fall of 1937, not long after he returned to the University of Arizona (UA). Haury had completed his Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees at UA in the late 1920s, and he returned to Tucson in July 1937 to become an assistant professor and head of the Department of Archaeology. When he became director of the Arizona State Museum in 1938, Haury instituted a site survey and files system modeled after one developed by the Gila Pueblo Archaeological Foundation, where he had worked prior to joining the UA faculty.

To learn more, see Haury’s essay, “Early Goals of the Arizona State Museum,”  in Vogler, ed. (1980), The Arizona State Museum Archaeological Site Survey System, Archaeological Series No. 128, pp. 155–159.

What Happened Here? The Tucson Basin through Time

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 23, No. 3 — Paleoindians in the American Southwest and Northern Mexico

The website of the Arizona Paleoindian Projectile Point Survey

 Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 23, No. 1 — The Latest Research on the Earliest Farmers

The Las Capas site was named one of Archaeology Magazine’s Top Ten Discoveries of 2009

What Is Romero Ruin, and What Is It Not? An Overview

Romero Compound Wall Clearing

Who Lived Here, and What Do We Know about Them? The Historic Remains

Special: Francisco and Victoriana RomeroJ. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Who Lived Here, and What Do We Know about Them? The Ancient Remains

To see additional views of the pottery ballcourt scene, visit the website of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The piece is also currently on display in the museum’s galleries.

For technical reports on our archaeological work in Catalina State Park, see:

Elson, Mark D., and William H. Doelle

1987  Archaeological Survey in Catalina State Park with a Focus on the Romero Ruin. Technical Report No. 87-4. Institute for American Research, Tucson.

Swartz, Deborah L.

1991  Archaeological Testing at the Romero Ruin. Technical Report No. 91-2. Center for Desert Archaeology, Tucson.

1993  Archaeological Testing at the Romero Ruin: Part 2. Technical Report 93-8. Center for Desert Archaeology, Tucson.

What Do Romero Ruin and Other Sites Nearby Tell Us about Life in the Distant Past?

The Sutherland Wash Rock Art District and Hohokam LifeJanine Hernbrode and Peter Boyle, Archaeology Southwest, and Henry D. Wallace, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

  1. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  2. Petroglyph Panels at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  3. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  4. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  5. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  6. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  7. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode
  8. Petroglyph Panel at Sutherland Wash Rock Art District

    Photo by Janine Hernbrode

 

The Romo Cache and Hohokam LifeDeborah L. Swartz, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and William H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

For the original publication of the cache and its contents, see:

Haury, Emil W., and Carol A. Gifford

1959  A Thirteenth Century “Strongbox.” The Kiva 24(4):1–11.

The Middle Cañada del Oro Valley CommunityWilliam H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 21, No. 3 — The Hohokam Archaeology of the Tucson Basin (opens as a PDF). This issue includes articles on Valencia Vieja, ballcourts, and Honey Bee Village.

For a formal report on excavations at Honey Bee Village, see:

Wallace, Henry D. (editor)

2012 Life in the Valley of Gold: Archaeological Investigations at Honey Bee Village, a Prehistoric Hohokam Ballcourt Village, Parts 1 and 2. Archaeology Southwest Anthropological Papers No. 48, Tucson. (Free downloads of additional information available at the linked title above.)

Growing Preservation Archaeology from Romero Ruin RootsWilliam H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology in Tucson Vol. 4, No. 4 — Digging the Romero Ruin (opens as a PDF). Before Archaeology Southwest Magazine, there was the Archaeology in Tucson newsletter. This 1991 edition discusses highlights of our work at Romero Ruin.

Hohokam Archaeological PreservesWilliam H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 26, No. 1 — What Is Preservation Archaeology? This special double issue includes an article on Hohokam archaeological preserves in the southern Tucson Basin and an in-depth look at the Julian Wash preserve.

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 23, No. 4 — Hohokam Heritage: The Casa Grande Community

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 21, No. 3 — The Hohokam Archaeology of the Tucson Basin (opens as a PDF). This issue includes articles on Valencia Vieja, ballcourts, and Honey Bee Village.

Website of the City of Tucson Historic Preservation Office

Website of the Pima County Cultural Resources and Historic Preservation Office

Back SightWilliam H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

Rainbow over Catalina State Park Entrance

Subscribe

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestShare on Tumblr