What We Do: Information

A Complicated Pattern

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 26, Nos. 3 & 4

Issue editor: Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest

Cover image: Detail of the interior of a Cliff Polychrome bowl from the Kuykendall site. Eastern Arizona College catalog no. 90-5-1019. Photograph by Mathew A. Devitt. Cover design by Kathleen Bader.

Salado is, at the very least, a complicated pattern of material culture that has intrigued and vexed archaeologists for decades—most researchers would agree on that. Ideas about what Salado means, however, vary greatly. This issue presents findings of Archaeology Southwest’s investigations in southwestern New Mexico, which are part of a long-term quest to understand the meaning of Salado.

To download information about the ceramic vessels pictured in this issue (PDF), click here.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ESSAY: Maverick Mountain Series and Salado Polychrome Origins — Patrick D. Lyons, Arizona State Museum and Archaeology Southwest (opens as a PDF). The PDF includes a gallery of vessels from the collections of the Arizona State Museum showing details of wares and types discussed in the essay.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ESSAY: Geologic Diversity and Ceramic Provenance in the Greater Upper Gila Region — Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest, and Mary F. Ownby, Desert Archaeology, Inc. (opens as a PDF)

Salado Potters

Artist’s visualization of potters working at the fourteenth-century Salado community now known as the 3-Up site.  Digital painting by Robert B. Ciaccio.

A Complicated Pattern: Pursuing the Meaning of Salado in Southwestern New Mexico — Jeffery J. Clark and Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 17, No. 3 (opens as a PDF) — Preservation Archaeology in the San Pedro Valley

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 20, No. 2 (opens as a PDF) — Archaeology on the Periphery: Recent Research in the Safford Basin

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 24, No. 4 — Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila

Who or What Was Salado? — Jeffery J. Clark and Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology Southwest’s long-term investigation of migration and change in the southern Southwest

Mule Creek Ecology and Settlement — J. Brett Hill, Hendrix College and Archaeology Southwest

Mule Creek slideshow

Ancient Farming and Gathering near Mule Creek — Michael W. Diehl, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Goosefoot (Britannica Online)

Pigweed (Britannica Online)

Religious Architecture and Continuity, 1200–1450: Evidence from the Fornholt Site and Ormand Village — Katherine A. Dungan, University of Arizona and Archaeology Southwest

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 24, No. 4 — Following the Kayenta and Salado Up the Gila

Katherine’s blog posts on an earlier period at Fornholt and on 2012 fieldwork at Fornholt (part 1 and part 2)

Poster presentation on excavations at the Fornholt site, with special attention to the Tularosa phase great kiva (opens as a PDF)

Plan view of Ormand structure adapted from the following sources:

Hammack, Laurens C., Stanley D. Bussey, and Ronald Ice

1966  The Cliff Highway Salvage Project. Preliminary Report by the Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe. On file, Archaeological Records Management Section, Historic Preservation Division, Santa Fe.

Wallace, Laurel T. (editor)

1998  The Ormand Village: Final Report on the 1965-1966 Excavation. Office of Archaeological Studies Archaeology Notes 229. Museum of New Mexico, Santa Fe.

Mule Creek Obsidian in the Time of Salado — Robert M. Jones, University of Arizona and Archaeology Southwest

Maverick Mountain Series and Salado Polychrome Origins — Patrick D. Lyons, Arizona State Museum and Archaeology Southwest

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ESSAY: Maverick Mountain Series and Salado Polychrome Origins — Patrick D. Lyons, Arizona State Museum and Archaeology Southwest (opens as a PDF). The PDF includes a gallery of vessels from the collections of the Arizona State Museum showing details of wares and types discussed in the essay.

Collections at the Arizona State Museum

The Mills Collection at Eastern Arizona College

To download information about the ceramic vessels pictured in this issue (PDF), click here.

Pottery, Heritage, and Archaeology in the Greater Upper Gila Region, 1200–1450 — Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest

Deb’s blog posts on ceramic analysis in the Upper Gila (part 1 and part 2) and on Salado polychrome pottery (part 1 and part 2)

Collections at the Arizona State Museum

The Mills Collection at Eastern Arizona College

To download information about the ceramic vessels pictured in this issue (PDF), click here.

Geologic Diversity and Ceramic Provenance in the Greater Upper Gila Region — Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest, and Mary F. Ownby, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE ESSAY: Geologic Diversity and Ceramic Provenance in the Greater Upper Gila Region — Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest, and Mary F. Ownby, Desert Archaeology, Inc. (opens as a PDF)

Salado Polychrome Style and Iconography — Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest, and Patrick D. Lyons, Arizona State Museum and Archaeology Southwest

Collections at the Arizona State Museum

The Mills Collection at Eastern Arizona College

Deb’s blog posts on Salado polychrome typology and style

To download information about the ceramic vessels pictured in this issue (PDF), click here.

Perceiving the Pattern: Some Answers and New Directions — Jeffery J. Clark and Deborah L. Huntley, Archaeology Southwest

2013 Preservation Archaeology Field School curriculum

Plan for work at the Dinwiddie site

Long-term Protection of the Places of the Past: Priority Cultural Resource Assessments and the Salado Preservation Initiative — Andy Laurenzi, Archaeology Southwest

The Salado Preservation Initiative

Back Sight — William H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest

Correction: In the map on page 4 and in the caption to the image on page 22, Redrock, New Mexico, is incorrectly given as Red Rock. We regret the error.

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