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Tucson Underground: The Archaeology of a Desert Community

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 24, Nos. 1–2
Free PDF download of this issue

Issue editor: William H. Doelle, Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology)

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Tucson is a place of great antiquity that has been transformed in dramatic ways over the past century. For more than sixty years, archaeologists working in and around the city’s downtown area have documented at least 4,000 years of changing lifeways. This double issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine explores what has been found underground and what it means.

This issue also marks the debut of complementary online content. We are pleased to share this special, additional information with Archaeology Southwest’s members and friends over the Internet.

Issue Highlights and New Media Content:

Tucson Underground: The Archaeology of a Desert Community – William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

This content requires Adobe Reader Map of Recent Archaeological Research in Downtown Tucson
This content requires Adobe Reader Guide to Recent Downtown Archaeological Projects
Adobe Flash is required to view this content Digital Video – Exploring Tucson: Modern, Historic, and Ancient

Resources for teachers and students

This content will open in a new window Downtown Underground: Archaeological Clues to Tucson’s Past – (2004) A teacher’s guide to the archaeology of Tucson’s origins, created by Kyle McCoy, Arizona Historical Society
This content requires Adobe Reader Black Mountain – Tucson’s Multicultural Past (2004) created by Bruce Hilpert and the Arizona State Museum
This content requires Adobe Reader Huellas del PasadoFootprints form the Past (2002) created by the Davis Bilingual Magnet School and the Arizona State Museum
This content will open in a new window Seeds of Knowledge – (2002) created by students at the Lawrence Intermediate School and the Arizona State Museum

Early Farming Settlements along the Santa Cruz River – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Experiements with Photosynth Touring Las Capas via Photosynth
This Content Requires Google Earth Google Earth Model of the Early Agricultural Period on Tumamoc Hill

Blowing Smoke – Jenny L. Adams, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Adobe Flash is required to view this content Digital Models of the Pipes of Las Capas

Early Ceramic and Hohokam Periods in Downtown Tucson – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Gaming Pieces from the Clearwater Site – Ralph Koziarski, Drayton Archaeological Project

Adobe Flash is required to view this content Digital Models of the Ancient Gaming Pieces

The Village of Chukson and Mission San Agustín – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Adobe Flash is required to view this content San Agustín Mission and Chukson Animation
This Content Requires Google Earth Google Earth Models of the San Agustín Mission
This content will open in a new window Friends of Tucson’s Birthplace

Twenty Years of Archaeology at the Tucson Presidio – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

This content requires Adobe Reader People of the Presidio – Family records from the Tucson Presidio – J. Homer Thiel
This content requires Adobe Reader People of the Presidio – Sources for family records from the Tucson Presidio – J. Homer Thiel

Cuartillas and Counterfeiters in the Borderlands – Alan Ferg, Arizona State Museum

Historic Era Farming – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

The Archaeology of Two Mexican Families – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Adobe Flash is required to view this content Digital Model of Frozen Charlotte Doll

Sister Amelia’s Crucifix – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Historic Tohono O’odham Pottery – James M. Heidke, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Warner’s Mill – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Archaeology along the Train Tracks – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Tucson Origins: Digital Resources – William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

The Wieland Bottling Works – Jeffrey T. Jones and Jennifer Hushour, Tierra Right of Way, Ltd.

The End of Life in Tucson – William H. Doelle, Center for Desert Archaeology

The Alameda–Stone Cemetery – Michael Heilen and Marlesa A. Gray, Statistical Research, Inc.

This content will open in a new window Pima County Website for the Alameda – Stone Cemetery

Los Angelitos – Michael Heilen and Kristin Sewell, Statistical Research, Inc.

The Forgotten Court Street Cemetery – J. Homer Thiel, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Endangered: Charles O. Brown House – William H. Doelle

The Marist College – Jennifer Levstik, Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation

This Content Requires Google Earth Google Earth Model of Marist College – Mathew Devitt

Back Sight — Preserving Tucson’s Past – William H. Doelle

Additional Online Resources

This content will open in a new window Tucson Downtown Partnership – Downtown Revitalization
This content will open in a new window Santa Cruz Heritage Alliance
This content will open in a new window Tucson Historic Preservation Foundation

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