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Exploring Zuni Origins

Archaeology Southwest Magazine Vol. 22, No. 2
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Issue editors: David A. Gregory, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and David R. Wilcox, Museum of Northern Arizona

Multi-storied, densely clustered architecture at Zuni Pueblo in the 1880s.

Multi-storied, densely clustered architecture at Zuni Pueblo in the 1880s.

This issue of Archaeology Southwest Magazine presents the results of a 2001 advanced seminar aimed at exploring the relationship between the modern Zuni and the archaeologically defined Mogollon culture, which may be ancestral to the Zuni. Articles in this issue are essentially abstracts of the authors’ contributions to Zuni Origins: Toward a New Synthesis of Southwestern Archaeology, a volume edited by Gregory and Wilcox (University of Arizona, 2007).

In the fall of 2001, Archaeology Southwest (formerly the Center for Desert Archaeology) and the Museum of Northern Arizona sponsored a five-day seminar attended by a veritable think-tank of scholars. Their task: to ascertain the origins of the Zuni people and influences that have affected their way of life.

Contributors to this issue examine archaeological, environmental, linguistic, historical, and geographical data on a macro-regional scale in their attempts to understand the complex issues of Mogollon-Zuni relationships and Zuni origins.

Articles include:

Exploring Zuni Origins — David A. Gregory, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and David R. Wilcox, Museum of Northern Arizona

Zunian as a Linguistic Isolate — Jane H. Hill, University of Arizona

Zuni Traditional History — T. J. Ferguson, Anthropological Research, LLC

Paleoenvironment and Zuni Origins — David A. Gregory, Desert Archaeology, Inc., Fred L. Nials, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and Jeffrey S. Dean, University of Arizona

Archaeological Methods for Tracing Zuni Origins — Jeffery J. Clark, Center for Desert Archaeology

The Archaic Origins of the Zuni — R. G. Matson, University of British Columbia, Retired

The Economic Origins of Zuni — Jonathan E. Damp, Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise

Mogollon, Zuni, and Sky Islands — Michael W. Diehl, Desert Archaeology, Inc.

Ceramics and Zuni Exchange, Migration, and Identity — Barbara J. Mills, University of Arizona, and C. Dean Wilson, New Mexico Office of Archaeological Studies

Rock Art of the Zuni Region: Boundaries, Traditions, and Networks of Communication — Polly Schaafsma, Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, and M. Jane Young, University of New Mexico, Retired

A Perishables Perspective on Mogollon-Zuni Relationships — Laurie D. Webster, University of Arizona

Zuni’s Place in the Long-Distance Exchange Systems — Arthur W. Vokes, Arizona State Museum

Zuni Settlement Patterns: A.D. 950–1680 — Keith Kintigh, Arizona State University

Zuni in the Puebloan and Southwestern Worlds, A.D. 1200–1600 — David R. Wilcox, Museum of Northern Arizona, David A. Gregory, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and J. Brett Hill, Center for Desert Archaeology

From Cushing to Compliance: Doing Archaeology at Zuni — Jonathan Damp, Zuni Cultural Resource Enterprise

Zuni Language Distribution — David A. Gregory, Desert Archaeology, Inc., and David R. Wilcox, Museum of Northern Arizona

Back Sight — William H. Doelle, President & CEO, Center for Desert Archaeology

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