Archive for January, 2016

Groundbreaking Research on Post-Contact Demography Highlights Population Decline at Jemez

Sunday, January 31st, 2016

Groundbreaking Research on Post-Contact Demography Highlights Population Decline at Jemez In the 1500s, the ponderosa pine forests of Jemez province in New Mexico were home to between 5000 and 8000 people. But after Europeans arrived in the area, the native population plummeted by more than 80%, probably because of a series of devastating epidemics. A […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Engaging Posters

Alexandra Norwood's Poster
Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist (January 26, 2016)—Two weeks ago, many of us here in Tucson enjoyed attending the 15th Biennial Southwest Symposium. It’s primarily a research conference for professionals, somewhat like the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) meetings I wrote about back in April. Unlike the SAA meetings, however, this conference is focused specifically […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Astonishing Early Agricultural Period Surface Shows Ancient Footprints in Tucson

Sunday, January 24th, 2016

Astonishing Early Agricultural Period Surface Shows Ancient Footprints in Tucson Dan Arnit of Innovative Excavating was working at the site of the planned Sunset Road connection to Silverbell Road just west of Interstate 10 when he came across something startling — prehistoric human footprints, possibly the oldest set found north of Mexico in the Southwest. “I […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

An Adobe Pompeii

Sunset Mesa Site Tour
Thursday, January 21st, 2016

Doug Gann, Preservation Archaeologist and Digital Media Specialist (January 21, 2016)—When reading book reviews or other arguments in archaeology, one of the more common put-downs is the dreaded “Pompeii premise.” An archaeologist accused of this, so it goes, has been naive in assuming that the objects found in a given place reflect the actual last use […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Isleta Pueblo Regains 140 Square Miles of Traditional Lands

Sunday, January 17th, 2016

Isleta Pueblo Regains 140 Square Miles of Traditional Lands A Native American pueblo at the edge of New Mexico’s largest city added 140 square miles of its historic homelands to its jurisdiction Friday under a deal the U.S. Interior Department says represents the single largest transfer of land back to a tribe’s control. Under the agreement, […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Introducing the Fremont

ASWM 29-4 Cover
Thursday, January 14th, 2016

In this issue, editor James R. Allison and authors briefly review what is known about the Fremont—the northern contemporaries of Ancestral Pueblo people—and share recent research on Fremont lifeways.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

You’re Invited: Making Archaeology Public

Aerial Photograph of the Early Agricultural Period Site of Las Capas. Image Copyright Henry Wallace 2011
Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Sarah Herr, Senior Project Director, Desert Archaeology, Inc. (January 12, 2016)—This Thursday night in Tucson, the 15th biennial Southwest Symposium opens. The Southwest Symposium has always been one of my favorite archaeological conferences, as archaeologists working in the Southwest United States and Northwest Mexico gather to discuss new research, new theories, and new ways of […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Expiration of the Land and Water Conservation Fund Was Also an Assault on Public Lands

Sunday, January 10th, 2016

Expiration of the Land and Water Conservation Fund Was Also an Assault on Public Lands When armed men shut down the 107-year-old Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in the sagebrush steppes of the northern Great Basin on Saturday, their anti-government anger put federal management of public lands in the West in the spotlight for the second time in a […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition Rejects Public Lands Initiative

Sunday, January 3rd, 2016

Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition Rejects Public Lands Initiative On December 31st, the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition sent a formal letter (opens in PDF) to Utah Congressmen Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz, discontinuing discussions over including tribal objectives in the Congressmen’s Public Lands Initiative. The PLI is a process initiated in 2013 by Congressman Bishop to […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today