Archive for July, 2015

Ordinary, yet Distinct

ASWM 29-1 Cover
Tuesday, July 28th, 2015

Issue editors Lewis Borck and Mike Bremer and contributors examine an ordinary, yet distinct population of Ancestral Pueblo people who lived in the Gallina region of northern New Mexico.



Filed Under: What's new in A.S.?

Monumental Rumors

Sunday, July 26th, 2015

Secret Meeting in Southern Utah Creates Expectations of a New Bear Ears National Monument Several top federal officials from Washington quietly attended a “Gathering of the Tribes” put on last weekend by Native Americans in southeastern Utah, their presence made known only to a chosen few who were “sworn to secrecy.” It’s the clearest signal yet […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

People’s Stuff

The Fork.
Friday, July 24th, 2015

By Kate Sarther Gann, Communications Coordinator   (July 24, 2015)—Archaeologists examine people’s stuff. As a former assistant museum curator, I can tell you that people’s stuff—at least, once that stuff is “vintage”—is pretty nifty. One of my favorite artifacts in the collections of the Arizona State Museum is a Tucson dog tag (license) from the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

2015 Field School Wrap-Up

Prepping Outreach Projects
Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Field School Co-Director and Preservation Archaeologist (July 23, 2015)—The end of the Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology Field School is always a bittersweet time, as students and staff members say goodbye to the teammates we’ve worked and lived with for six very intense weeks. For our students, it’s time to move on to […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Firsthand Account of Federal Hearing on the Fracking of the Chaco Landscape

Monday, July 20th, 2015

Firsthand Account of Federal Hearing on the Fracking of the Chaco Landscape When you represent regular people fighting against the oil and gas industry, you get used to playing David to their Goliath. Still, when I went into court on July 13, with my single co-counsel, I didn’t expect to have to face off against […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Using a Multidisciplinary Approach to Interpret Artifacts

Dr. Joe Ben Wheat
Friday, July 17th, 2015

Lindsay Shepard, Arizona State University As an archaeology student, a question I’m frequently asked is, “How do you know that (insert artifact name here) was really used in that way?” Because the objects I study are not accompanied by textual evidence, some of my non-archaeologist friends are skeptical as to whether or not we can […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Flakes, Points, and Little Obsidian Discs

Projectile Points
Thursday, July 16th, 2015

Stacy Ryan, Lithics Lab Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School Now that excavations at the Dinwiddie site are complete, the students are focused on writing detailed summaries about what we’ve learned these past five weeks. Our days here have been incredibly full with fieldwork, ceramics and lithics labs, and evening lectures. These last few days at […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

In the kaigim of our ancestors who once inhabited this land

Make Soapstone Turtle
Wednesday, July 15th, 2015

Marcy Pablo, Tohono O’odham College kaigim [guy-gym]—animal hide sandals (Tohono O’odham word for sandals) My journey started out at our local Himdag Ki: cultural center and museum on the Tohono O’odham Nation. While taking a couple of archaeology classes at Pima Community College, I became interested in archaeology, and now I am attending my first […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

The Sirens

Desert Sunset
Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Dushyant Naresh, Vassar College Eyelids slowly wilt as the soothing hum of the car engine lulls me to sleep. The rising sun casts a golden glow across the endless landscape, with subtle magentas, yellows, and blues fusing together the feathery clouds. Desert grasses and prickly pear cacti blanket the soil, stretching into the distance as […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Learning the Landscape

Recording a Site
Monday, July 13th, 2015

Barry Price Steinbrecher, Survey Director, Preservation Archaeology Field School The 2015 survey component of the field school primarily focused on surveying land on the Pitchfork Ranch in the Burro Mountains south of Silver City. The ranch owners generously hosted us as we hiked our way through the rolling hills of their ranch, scaling the terraces […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

President Obama Declares Three New National Monuments

Sunday, July 12th, 2015

President Obama Declares Three New National Monuments Oak woodlands, rugged mountains, and mammoth bones are among the newest protected natural treasures in the United States, as President Barack Obama is expected to designate three new national monuments Friday. The president has created more than a dozen new monuments on land and sea during his term, using […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Connecting the Past to the Present

Making Paint
Friday, July 10th, 2015

Anna Porter, State University of New York at Buffalo The first thing that comes to mind when you think about archaeology is not usually involvement in modern society. Archaeologists study things that happened thousands of years ago—how could this be relevant to today? What I learned at this field school, however, is that community is […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Career Directions

Paul Reed at Chaco
Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

Victoria Bowler, University of New Mexico Since graduating with an Anthropology degree three years ago, I have been putting off graduate school and roaming to and from National Park Service sites in the Southwest. My seasonal nomadic employment has supplied me with so many friends and networks and a glimpse into a possible lifetime career […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Necessary

Excavating Adobe Walls
Wednesday, July 8th, 2015

Alisha Stalley, Northern Arizona University In early February, I began the relatively short quest of finding a field school to attend. After receiving my acceptance letter from Karen Schollmeyer on behalf of Archaeology Southwest, I excitedly told my close friends and family, some of whom asked why it was so important and if it was […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

My Brief Break from Quantitative Analysis

Gila Cliff Dwellings
Tuesday, July 7th, 2015

Lindsay Shepard, Arizona State University When it comes to archaeological research, I tend to stick to the technical side of things. I especially enjoy using technologies such as laser scanning and 3-D modeling to analyze artifacts and features to gather quantitative data. Because of my preference for these types of analyses, I typically consider questions […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Preservation in Action at Cedar Mesa and Chaco

Sunday, July 5th, 2015

Efforts to Save Utah’s Cedar Mesa Reach a Crescendo The gnats and mosquitos were out in force that mid-June evening at our campsite, as was the Indian paintbrush, the penstemon, globe mallow and other wildflowers whose names I don’t know. The long day’s last light slowly ran its fingers down the sinewy sandstone wave of Comb […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Meeting with Senator Tom Udall at Chaco Canyon

Looking north along Chaco's Great North Road toward the site of Pierre's.
Thursday, July 2nd, 2015

By Paul F. Reed, Preservation Archaeologist June 30, 2015—As many of you know, I’ve been actively engaged in protecting the Greater Chaco Landscape for much of the last year. Impacts to this amazing landscape from the development of oil-gas facilities in association with the Mancos Shale play could be severe. I think that our efforts, […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog