Archive for June, 2015

Conservationists Push to Preserve Chaco Landscape

Sunday, June 28th, 2015

Conservationists Push to Preserve Chaco Landscape Paul Reed, a preservation archaeologist with Tucson-based Archaeology Southwest and a Chaco scholar, led tribal members of the Acoma Historic Preservation Office and others to Chaco Culture National Historical Park and the park’s outlying areas last week to raise awareness of the impacts of oil and gas development on […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Contrasts

Chaco Ceiling
Thursday, June 25th, 2015

Connor Walsh, University of Notre Dame Several months ago, when I was considering my options for an archaeological field school, I hoped to choose a school which would broaden my experience; all of my previous work was in Ireland, and I knew that my base of knowledge was therefore limited to the idiosyncrasies of archaeology […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Survey equals fun; sort of.

Burro Mountain Survey
Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

Diana Trevizo, Eastern New Mexico University The first time I heard that we were going to have the opportunity to participate in archaeological survey in addition to excavation, I was ecstatic! Before attending this field school, I had participated in mock excavations at Eastern New Mexico University and thus had a general idea of what […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

New Normal

Mule Creek Sunrise
Monday, June 22nd, 2015

Alexandra Norwood, Arizona State University To me, field school has been all about new experiences. New isn’t always better and adjustment has been, in large part, learning to love some part of any situation. There have been struggles: frustration when the excavators in other units find artifacts and I only find centipedes, moths getting into […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Another Study Finds Kennewick Man Was Native American

Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Another Study Finds Kennewick Man Was Native American On Thursday, Danish scientists published an analysis of DNA obtained from the skeleton. Kennewick Man’s genome clearly does not belong to a European, the scientists said. “It’s very clear that Kennewick Man is most closely related to contemporary Native Americans,” said Eske Willerslev, a geneticist at the University […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Ideologies of Inclusion

First Field School Meal
Sunday, June 21st, 2015

Alexander Ballesteros, Northern Arizona University The Southwest United States has a long history of cultural coalescence, and as a fourth-generation Arizonan, I have a firsthand glimpse at the history of group aggregations in the region. Some historic instances of cultural coalescence in Arizona include the Spanish conquest of indigenous populations and various migrations into the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

The Spark

Gila Cliff Dwellings
Friday, June 19th, 2015

Monica Veale, University of Texas at Arlington As a child, my first experience with archaeology was a long road trip to Portland, Oregon, for a family reunion. The trip involved stops in Mesa Verde National Park, Bandelier National Monument, and Gila Cliff Dwellings. I was only eight years old at the time, but I can […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

What We’re Doing at the 2015 Field School

Measuring Adobe Room
Thursday, June 18th, 2015

Karen Gust Schollmeyer, Preservation Archaeologist As you can tell if you’re following Archaeology Southwest on Facebook, our 2015 field season is off and running! This year, as in the past, students are rotating through experiences in excavation, archaeological survey, field laboratory analysis, and experimental archaeology. Our twelve undergraduates and two graduate students have come together […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Preservation and Purpose at the PZ Ranch

PZ Ranch
Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

By Andy Laurenzi, Southwest Field Representative All buildings—whether agricultural, residential, industrial, or commercial—are built with a purpose and function in mind. The owners spend money to construct and maintain the structure to fulfill that purpose and function. There is an economic calculus at play that balances the financial costs against the value of the purpose […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

New Skills

Obisidian Point
Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Joe Hall, Cochise College Part of our field school experimental archaeology work includes a hike to the San Francisco River to work on flinknapping and atlatl carving. On our recent hike with instructor Allen Denoyer, fellow student Lindsay Shepard and I were lucky to be accompanied by visiting guest and archaeobotanist Dr. Karen Adams. As […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Innovative Preservation Compromise or a Rather Tough Bargain?

Sunday, June 14th, 2015

Indian Camp Ranch – Innovative Preservation Compromise or a Rather Tough Bargain? The first archaeological subdivision in America has a simple premise: The owner of each roughly 35-acre plot is guaranteed that his or her property contains archaeological sites. The covenants of the homeowners association allow residents to excavate on their land under the supervision of a […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Construction of Ancient Weapons

Finished Atlatl
Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Devinne Fackelman, Grand Valley State University A few days ago, I was given the opportunity to construct two common and well-used ancient weapons: a dart point (kind of like an arrowhead, but not used with an arrow) and an atlatl. I had flintknapped and thrown an atlatl dart in the past, but not to the […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Cave Creek Midden Site: A Collaborative Site Protection Story, Part 2

The Smiths
Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

By Linda Pierce, Deputy Director On this blog, Andy Laurenzi recently described the collaborative process that led to Archaeology Southwest’s acceptance of a conservation easement on a 51-acre parcel in southeastern Arizona. The purpose of this easement is to protect, in perpetuity, the significant archaeological resources located on the property, making them available for future […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Tent Life

Tent Sanctuary
Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

Alexandra Flores, Beloit College Growing up in a big city has its pros and cons, one of the latter being that I have not had a lot of outdoor camping experience. I have slept in a tent a couple times in the past, but not for 5 weeks straight. Before this field school I had […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

The Southwestern Archaeology Community Notes the Passing of Roger Lidman

Sunday, June 7th, 2015

The Southwestern Archaeology Community Notes the Passing of Roger Lidman Roger studied public history, public administration, and business administration ultimately graduating from Arizona State University with a degree in anthropology. He started working part time at Pueblo Grande Museum June 1976, becoming its director in 1990. During his 38-year tenure, he made great friends in […]



Filed Under: Southwest Archaeology Today

Pottery Workshop with Andy Ward

Andy Ward
Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Allen Denoyer, Preservation Archaeologist and Ancient Technologies Expert   The field school students and some of the staff took part in a pottery workshop on the afternoon of the 31st. Potter Andy Ward presented the workshop. He brought out two buckets of prepared clay for the students and staff to try their hands at making […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog

Preparations

Loading Up
Monday, June 1st, 2015

Leslie Aragon, Excavation Director and University of Arizona Doctoral Program The beginning of the summer field school season is always an exciting time of year. Every year, the staff of the Upper Gila Preservation Archaeology (UGPA) field school (a partnership between Archaeology Southwest and the University of Arizona School of Anthropology) heads out a week […]



Filed Under: Preservation Archaeology Blog